Bennett Misc History

 

 

The Family History of Emerick Bennett (1838 – 1930)

 

of Burk, New York

 

“As told in their own words”

 

Assembled by Larry Smith, Emerick’s great great grandson

315 Laurelwood Drive

Jacksonville, Oregon97530

twinhiker@clearwire.net

541-899-7402

November 2011

 

With an abundance of assistance from:

cousin Beverly Caton Pinelli

999 Old San Jose Road #9

Soquel, CA 9507

 

And from Ralph Bennett of SaranacLake, FranklinCounty, New York 12983

_____________

 

 

The Smith family connection to the Bennetts

 

Garret Bennett b. 1801 – 1862

Emerick Bennett (1838 – 1930)

Elmer Cortes Bennett(1860 – 1912)

Gertrude Bennett Smith (1885 – 1981)

Elmer Bennett Smith (1913 – 2010)

Larry Bennett Smith & Lloyd Christian Smith

b. 1940

Brian Bennett Smith b. 1969

Everest Bennett Smith b. 2004

Keith Lloyd Smith b. 1971

J. Bennett Smith b. 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

12/26/11 11:39 AM, “Liz & Ralph Bennett” <bennett5@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Dear Larry,
I have no proof that the Bennett line came from England.  When I was about ten years old, my grandfather Bennett told me that the Bennetts came from England.  I think at the time he also told me the lineage to England, but it went in one ear and out the other.  Sorry that I can not help you with the connection to England.

Ralph

=========================================

 

Family of Garret Bennett, born 1801, Peru, Clinton County, New York.  Garret was killed in a hunting accident/murder.  Found dead in the woods.  Worked as a farmer on his own farms in both Clinton and Franklin counties. Garret was also a professional hunter providing wild meat and fish to Upstate New York resorts in the Paul Smith’s area.  Died: November 1862/63.

 

Garret wed to: Orpah Jeffers, born 1803, New York or Vt., and died sometime between 1850 – 1860.  She worked in a Vermont woolen mill before her marriage to Garret.

 

Bennett children: All born in Peru, New York

 

1.  Jefferson, born 1827.  Worked as a teamster, a farmer, and a farm laborer.  Apparently he never married and is listed as head of the household in the 1860 census.  He eventually lived with the Hialman Bennetts in his later years.

 

2.  Justice – “Jack” – b. 1829.  Worked as a Collier (coal miner).  Wed to Lucretia Jackson, b. 1832 in New York.  Twin sister of brother Emerick’s wife, Lucia Jackson Bennett.  Jack ran a logging camp in the Adirondack Mountains.  Emerick and son, Elmer Cortis, worked there during the winters.  Justice is Ralph Bennett’s g. g. grandfather.

 

A. German, born 1855. Was nicknamed “Germ” before they knew about the bug.

 

B.  William, born 1857

 

C.  Sidney, born 1860, nicknamed “Sid”.

 

D.  Addie, born 1864, Assisted Elmer Cortis Bennett after his wife died in 1898 in Ada, Minnesota and left Elmer with three young motherless children. Addie’s kindness made such an impression on young Gertrude, that she named her second daughter, Addie Smith (Wold), after her Aunt Addie.

 

E.  Atwood, born 1856.  The 1870 census of FranklinCounty shows Atwood living with the Emerick Bennetts.

 

F.  Lucretia, born 1867

 

3.  Orpaha Durlusky (Lecky), born 1832

 

4.  Hialman, born 1834.  Worked as a laborer, by the age of 45 he was a tanner. Wed. to Luch        Ann, who was born in Vermont.

 

A.  Jefford D., born 1857

 

B.  Charles H, born

 

C.  Emma V., born 1860.  By age 20 she was working as a servant girl.

 

D. James G., born 1873.  Became a farm laborer in his teens

 

E. Lester E., born 1866.  “Helps around”.

 

F. Corrie L., born 1868

 

G. male, born 1873

 

H. Lana, born 1877

 

I.  Elmer, born June 1880.

 

5. Emerick, (Em) Bennett, born March 1, 1838.  Was working as a collier (coal miner) when he volunteered for the Civil War in 1862.  Died January 30, 1930 in Burke, New York.  Burial: BurkeCenter, New York. Emerick is Larry Bennett Smith’s g.g. grandfather.

 

Wed to: Lucia Jackson, born in 1840 in Clinton County, New York.  Lucia is the twin sister of Jack’s wife, Lucretia. Married March 12, 1857 in Peru, New York. Died May, 1908.  Her father was born in England. Her mother’s ancestors were Dutch settlers of New   York.

 

Children:

 

A. Elmer Cortis Bennett, b. January 20, 1860.  Died April 22, 1912, Ellensburg, Washington.  Wed: Ida Cora Call, born June 18, 1866, in New York.  Died November 23, 1898 in Ada, Minnesota. Ida’s parents were William Call and Julia Jackson, sister of Lucia Jackson.  Married in Ada, Minnesota in 1883.

 

Remarried: Dora DeLair Patterson, a widow, October 1904 in Alberta,             Canada.

 

Children:

 

1. Gertrude May Bennett, born November 8, 1885 in Ada, Minnesota. Died, Feb. 4, 1981 in Los Angeles, California.. Wed: to Aaron Victor Smith, born November 21, 1876, Marshall County, Kansas.  Died June 26, 1857, in Kalispell, Montana.  Married: March 29, 1905 in Alberta, Canada. See the Smith Family History for a more detailed family listing of Gertrude’s many descendents.

 

2. Winifred (Winnie) Grace Bennett, born July 10, 1894 in Ada, Minnesota.  Died March 29, 1964 in Ontario, California.  Wed to: John Frizell., born October 30, 1888, Greenfield, Iowa.  Died: November 11, 1949, Los   Angeles, California.  Winnie left home and was “encouraged” to live with her former step brother-in-law upon the remarriage of her father to Dora Patterson and the subsequent arrival of her stepsister Ellie Deacon and her kids. It was a very difficult time for Winnie. John and Winnie were married in Durango, Colorado, December 14, 1912.

 

Child:

 

1.  Jewel Elaine Frizell, born: May 27, 1917, Durango, Colorado.  Died March 6, 1977, Los Angles, California. Wed to: John M. Leavitt, born February 27, 1913 in Cardston, Alberta, Canada.  Died March 25, 1978.  Married on February 14, 1939, in Santa Anna, California. John was a race horse trainer.  Winnie became an accomplished photographer.

 

Child:

a.  Judith Ann ((WinAnn) Frizell, born, February 13, 1942. Wed to: James Jewel Patterson, born April 19, 1941.  Married December 30, 1960 in Chino, California.

 

My mother named me WinAnn for my two grandmothers Winifred and Ann. When my birth certificate came it read Judith Ann. That’s when she found out grandma Winifred did not  like the name and had bribed a nurse in the hospital to let her changed the name on the certificate to Judith Ann.  When I  turned 14 I was told the story and stated going the name my parents named me, WinAnn.  Grandma Winifred called me WinAnn until the day she died, but Mama called me Judy. Mama said my birth certificate did not say WinAnn. I never had the nerve to tell Mama that my birth certificate didn’t  say JUDY either. I was a source of contention from birth.

 

1.  James John Patterson, born March 8, 1962, in Topeka, Kansas.

 

2. Ann Elizabeth Patterson, born June 3, 1963, Upland, California

 

3. Robert Daniel Patterson, born April 1, 1968, Tacoma, Washington

 

4. Wendy Elaine Patterson, June 1, 1972,             Medford, Oregon

 

5. John M. Leavitt Patterson, born May 4, 1976, Medford, Oregon

 

3. Chester Oscar Bennet, b. November 6, 1892, Ada, Minnesota, d.                                     Nov. 27, 1942. War casualty in a POW camp in the                                            Philippines, Burial date May 13, 1949. age 50 at death.  Was                               listed in the Alberta, Canada as a Methodist.

 

Bonnie Adelaide. Bennett, b. September 12, 1892, Vassar,                       Michigan, Date of death Dec. 24, 1978, Burial date Dec. 26,                     1978. Age 86, ThornhillValley Mortuary

 

Chester and Bonnie were married, June 22, 1919 in                                                      Spokane, Washington. They had no children.

 

Submitted by: Lisa J. Schureman
Email address: kinasil@comcast.net

Husband: BENNETT, Elmer William
Birthdate: 10 September 1868
Birthplace: Millington, Tuscola, MI
Death date: 5 May 1947
Place of death: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Burial: Pines Cemetery, Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Father: BENNETT, Cyrus D.
Mother: WILLIAMS, Ellen Jane

Marriage date: 21 December 1891
Marriage place: Vassar, Tuscola, MI

Wife: DEAN, Mary Jane
Birthdate: 14 March 1869
Birthplace: Caistor, Ontario, Canada
Death date: 5 June 1959
Place of death: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Burial: Pines Cemetery, Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Father: DEAN, Hannibal Rathburn, Sr.
Mother: HEWSON/HOUSTON, Catherine

CHILDREN

Child No. 1: BENNETT, Bonnie Adelaide
Sex: F
Birthdate: 12 September 1892
Birthplace: Vassar, Tuscola, MI
Death date: 23 December 1978
Place of death: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Burial: Pines Cemetery, Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Marriage date: 22 June 1919
Marriage place: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Spouse’s name: BENNETT, Chester Oscar

Child No. 2: BENNETT, Charlotte Adelaide
Sex: F
Birthdate: 19 November 1901
Birthplace: East Tawas, Iosco, MI
Death date: 3 March 1979
Place of death: Spokane, Spokane, WA
Burial: Pines Cemetery, Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Marriage date: 17 February 1924
Marriage place: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Spouse’s name: SCHUREMAN, Charles Arlington, Jr.

Child No. 3: BENNETT, Ruth Idaho
Sex: F
Birthdate: 30 September 1903
Birthplace: Colburn, Kootenai, ID
Death date: 22 February 1982
Place of death: Spokane, Spokane, WA
Burial: Pines Cemetery, Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Marriage date: 30 August 1935
Marriage place: Opportunity, Spokane, WA
Spouse’s name: LEONARD, Charles Wesley

Child No. 4: BENNETT,
Sex: F
Birthdate: Circa August 1912
Birthplace: Sandpoint, Bonner, ID
Death date:
Place of death:
Burial:
Marriage date:
Marriage place:
Spouse’s name:

Documentation: US Federal Censuses: 1900 Iosco Co., MI, 1910 Bonner Co., ID, 1920 & 1930 Spokane Co., WA. Birth notices for Ruth Idaho & Baby girl Bennett. Marriage certificates for Bonnie Adelaide Bennett & Chester Oscar Bennett & Charlotte Marie Bennett & Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr. Marriage announcements for Bonnie Adelaide Bennett, Charlotte Marie Bennett, & Ruth Idaho Bennett. Obituaries for Chester Oscar Bennett, Bonnie Adlaide Bennett, Charlotte Marie Meier, and Ruth Idaho Leonard. Newspapers referenced; Kootenai County Republican, Northern Idaho News, Spokane Valley Herald, & the Spokesman-Review

 

 

From: kinasil@comcast.net
To: “Lloyd Smith” <LSmithTwin@Comcast.net>
Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2011
Subject: Re: Working on…

Bernard Eugene Schureman is Bonnie & Chester’s nephew.  He is the son of Bonnie’s sister Charlotte (Lottie) Marie Bennett & Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr.  After his father left in 1931 for Michigan his mother who was a symphony violionist went back to Eastern Washington to get a teaching degree so she could support the family and do to the loss of the Schureman family home she had to move back in with her parents.  Dad went to live with Bonnie and Chester for about two years while they were stationed at FortLawton in Seattle while his little sister stayed in Spokane.  Chester was the positive male role model for my Dad growing up.  Dad didn’t see his father until he had graduated, joined the Army, and was passing through Chicago on his way back East and found that they didn’t have much to say to each other.  The Army did a thorough background check not only because of his father’s record but because the American Nazi Party had contacted the family during WWII.  Awkward!  We’re Dutch Schuremans not German ones.  The photos are a combination of Warren & Washington County, NY, Bennett photos and those that Dad inherited from Bonnie that have members of Chester’s family in them.  I finally figured out that the one photo we have of a man in robes is the Reverend Rensselear Bennett.  The genealogy had to catch up with the photos.  Unfortunately, by the time I started the genealogy the generation that I could have asked were either dead or sinking into dementia.  I will send a photocopy of my parents before Dad’s osteoperosis and removal of his right eye.  I threatened to take a picture of them after Mom had cataract surgery, nearly didn’t survive that suggestion.

 

 

4. Baby – Died Nov. 14, 1898

          The baby boy was placed in his dead                                               mother’s arms for eternity. Both died and were                              buried in Ada, Minnesota. The mother died eleven                         days after her little baby boy.

 

B. Orpha Bennett, born April 3, 1862.  The two girls married brothers             with the last name of Harris.

 

C. Leslie G. Bennett, born September 15, 1867.  There were three children born to this union, one boy and two girls.

 

D. Jefferson D. Bennett, born October 13, 1869.  Jefferson and his wife Alice lived in Burke, New York. Alice wrote a letter in support of Emerick’s application for a Civil War pension.  They had one daughter who married Leslie’s only boy. A cousin marrying a cousin.

 

E.  Celia S. Bennett, born January 2, 1879.  One of the two girls who married a brother named Harris.

 

7.  Celia Bennett, born 1872.  Became a housekeeper by 1860, apparently after her parents’ deaths.

 

8.  Silas Bennett, born 1844, worked as a farm laborer

 

9.  Carter Bennett, born 1843, worked as a farm laborer

 

10.  Corter Bennett, born about 1860.  Listed only on the 1860 census.

 

====================

 

 

 

AuSable Fork, N.Y.12912

March 18, 2003

 

Larry:

 

In response to your letter of March 13, 2003. Re: Garret Bennett. I am sorry to say; my records do not show any Garret Bennett.  Probably the reason is of two fires that swept the town in that time and destroyed all the records.

 

Sincerely,

 

Doris Akey

Historian

Note: Garrett – Garret – Bennett – Bennet are all variations of the same person.

 

From: Larry Smith lsmith@wave.net

Date:   Mon, 10 Mar 2003 23:23:20 – 0700

To:  prutownhistorian@charter.net

 

Subject:  Garret Bennet

 

Garret Bennett (Garret Bennet in the Peru History book) is my great-great grandfather.  He is listed in the “History of Peru, NY,” 1850 landowner list.

 

Do you have any other information on the man?

 

Larry Bennett Smith

Jacksonville, Oregon

 

===================

SUBJECT:    Re:  Garret Bennet (sic)

DATE:            Thursday, March 13, 2003 1:52 PM
FROM:          Ronald C. Allen perutownhistorian@carter.net

TO:                 Larry Smith lsmith@wave.net

 

Larry,

 

I apologize for the delay in responding to your query.  I have been ill with a pesky intestinal virus and have not checked e-mail for a couple of days.  A quick check of Peru records has turned up nothing additional on Garret Bennett.  However, Hurd’s History of Clinton and FranklinCounties, New York, 1880, lists Garret Bennet in the original account-book of the J. & J. Rogers Ironworks, opening in 1832, and kept at Black Brook.  He is listed as one of the earliest settlers on page 245.  Black Brook is a township that now forms the southwest border of Peru.  At one time, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Peru encompassed the area now known as Black Brook.  The J. & J. Rogers Company was very prominent and instrumental in the settlement of this area.  They built a large forge in Black Brook and later branched out with business in Ausable Forks and Clintonville.  The J. & J. Rogers Company prospered in Ausable Forks until well into the mid-twentieth century when it was destroyed by fire.

 

If you have not already checked, I might suggest that you look at the census records for both Peru and Black Brook for the period 1830-1860.  You may also want to contact the town of Black   Brook Historian:  Doris Akey, P.O. Box 715, Ausable Forks, N.Y. 12912.

 

I will be happy to send you a photocopy of Hurd’s pg. 245 if you send me your mailing address.

 

Good luck in your search.

 

Ron Allen

 

 

 

Sisters – Orpha & Celia Bennett  

 

(See photos of Orpha and Celia in the Bennett photo section of this report.)

 

Ralph Bennett – Feb 17, 2005

 

Location: Feinberg Library       Compiled by Ralph Bennett

New YorkStateUniversity

Plattsburgh, NY

 

The following was copied from the file card in the special collection section of the library: PERU MM 4/1   MethodistChurch. Peru Circuit. Records, 1839-1861

Bound volume labeled “Subscribers to the First Centenary of Methodism,” provided the Peru Circuit by the Troy Conference of the MethodistChurch for the recording of contributors to the centenary fund.   The first few pages comprise this list of subscribers.

 

Later pages appear to be membership rolls of the several classes and societies in the Peru Circuit.   1 MS vol.

Title: Subscribers to the First Centenary of Methodism

 

Place: Peru, Clinton   County, New York

 

Note:   Orpha and Celia Bennett are daughters of Garret Bennett and Orpha JEFFERS Bennett

 

All material below was hand written

First date in book is given as “Oct. 1839”

 

(A). “PeruChurch Record Conference Year Commencing Saturday, May 21st 1853.”

“Class No.4″, Page 2, line 1, – “Orpha Bennett”

 

(B). “No.5 West Church record continue May 1855″ line 15 “Orpha Bennett”

 

(C). “West Church Class 1856-57″ line 9 “Orpha Bennett”

 

(D). “West Church Class Society Class No.1 Feb. 1860” line 15 “Orpha Bennett” and line 20 “Celia Bennett”

 

 

 

AHNENTAFEL IS GERMAN for ancestor (ahnen) table (tafel). Preparing an ahnentafel chart is a very efficient way of organizing your pedigree chart in order to make it quickly understandable by others.

On a standard pedigree chart, each person is assigned a number. These numbers are worth remembering since, if you follow the traditional numbering system, just by looking at a number you can know the relationship of any person on the chart to yourself. You are always 1, your father 2, your mother 3, paternal grandfather 4, paternal grandmother 5, maternal grandfather 6, maternal grandmother 7, patrilineal great grandfather 8, and so on in consecutive fashion.

Using this system, one quickly notices some patterns. First, each new generation has double the number of ancestors of the previous generation. Thus you have four grandparents, eight great-grandparents, 16 great-great-grandparents and so on. By the 10th generation, you will have completed research on more than 1,000 ancestors; many will be unknown and others will be duplicates because of cousin intermarriage (it is estimated that before 1800 about 40 percent of marriages were between first, second or third cousins). Every father on your chart will have an even number and every mother will have an odd number that is her husband’s plus one.

Traditional pedigree charts usually print four generations to a page so that 16 generations usually take around four pages to display. The beauty of an ahnentafel is that these same 16 generations would fit on one page, depending on the type size chosen, and the same numbering system used in a standard pedigree chart again allows you to quickly discern your kinship with anyone on the ahnentafel.

 

Your Ahnentafel

 

The ahnentafel takes the numbering system described above and uses it to create a continuous list of ancestors instead of a chart. The format would be as follows:

 

1. your name

2. your father

3. your mother

4. your father’s father

5. your father’s mother

6. your mother’s father

7. your mother’s mother

8. your father’s father’s father

9. your father’s father’s mother

10. your father’s mother’s father

11. your father’s mother’s mother

12. your mother’s father’s father

13. your mother’s father’s mother

14. your mother’s mother’s father

15. your mother’s mother’s mother

16-31. your great-great-grandparents

32-63. your great-great-great grandparents

 

An ahnentafel is particularly useful when you are corresponding with another genealogist in your family because indicating unknown ancestors with a blank space or line will allow them to see immediately where your genealogical research ends and, from the names and dates given, where you might have common ancestry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And now for the Bennett ahnentafel chart.

 

 

 

Orpha Jeffers               “Little” Roots

 

Entries: 10745    Updated: Tue Jan 14 09:37:08 2003    Contact: Pat Lee     Home Page: “Little” Roots p8508385@aol.com

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Ahnentafel, Generation No. 1

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1.Orpha JEFFERS was born 1803 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY, and died UNKNOWN in Peru (Clinton), NY. She was the daughter of 2. Deodatus JEFFERS and 3. Eunice HEATH. She married Garret BENNETT. He was born ABT. 1798, and died November 1862 – murdered in upper New York..

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Ahnentafel, Generation No. 2

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2.         Deodatus JEFFERS was born 20 DEC 1766 in Sheffield, MA, and died 14 APR 1854 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. He was buried UNKNOWN in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. He was the son of 4. David Jeffers DEODATUS.

 

3.         Eunice HEATH was born 2 JAN 1771 in Sandisfield, MA, and died 23 APR 1845 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. She was buried UNKNOWN in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. She was the daughter of 6. Levi HEATH and 7. Abigail UNKNOWN.

Children of Eunice HEATH and Deodatus JEFFERS are:

i.        Charlotte JEFFERS was born ABT. 1798, and died UNKNOWN.

ii.       Laura JEFFERS was born ABT. 1800, and died UNKNOWN.

1.           iii.     Orpha JEFFERS was born 1803 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY, and died UNKNOWN in Peru (Clinton), NY. She married Garret BENNETT. He was born ABT. 1798, and died, November 1862..

iv.      Orra JEFFERS was born 11 JUL 1800 in Corinth, NY, and died UNKNOWN in Chester (Warren), NY. She married Amos BUTLER in NY. He was born ABT. 1795, and died UNKNOWN. She married Unknown EFFNER. He was born ABT. 1795, and died UNKNOWN.

v.       Sidney JEFFERS was born 26 SEP 1802 in Hadley, NY, and died 20 FEB 1899 in Amsterdam, NY. He married Nancy GRAHAM. She was born 14 AUG 1803 in VT, and died 16 DEC 1890 in Hadley, NY.

vi.      Belinda JEFFERS was born ABT. 1808, and died UNKNOWN. She married Ariel KENDALL. He was born ABT. 1803, and died UNKNOWN.

vii.     Jefferson JEFFERS was born 10 JAN 1810 in Cobbleskill, NY, and died 30 MAY 1888 in Greenfield, NY. He married Martha Blackman BURTON, daughter of Benjamin BURTON and Anna BELDEN. She was born 14 MAY 1810 in Greenfield, NY, and died 3 DEC 1892 in Cobleskill, NY.

viii.   Elizabeth JEFFERS was born 5 JAN 1812 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY, and died UNKNOWN. She married Myron TRIPP. He was born ABT. 1813, and died UNKNOWN.

ix.        Manlius JEFFERS was born 29 FEB 1816 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY, and died 15 AUG 1888 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. He married Myra HOLDEN 3 JAN 1836 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. She was born 8 OCT 1817, and died 25 NOV 1889.

x.       Julia JEFFERS was born ABT. 1818, and died UNKNOWN.

 

 

————————————————————————

Ahnentafel, Generation No. 3

————————————————————————

 

4.         David Jeffers DEODATUS was born ABT. 1741, and died 14 APR 1854.

Child of David Jeffers DEODATUS is:

2.           i.        Deodatus JEFFERS was born 20 DEC 1766 in Sheffield, MA, and died 14 APR 1854 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. He married Eunice HEATH 1792, daughter of Levi HEATH and Abigail UNKNOWN. She was born 2 JAN 1771 in Sandisfield, MA, and died 23 APR 1845 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY.

 

6.         Levi HEATH was born 28 APR 1743 in Stafford, CT, and died 27 AUG 1818 in New Marlborough, MA. He was the son of 12. Isaac HEATH and 13. Elizabeth SCRIPTURE.

 

7.         Abigail UNKNOWN was born ABT. 1748 in Sandisfield, CT, and died BET. 1776 – 1779.

Children of Abigail UNKNOWN and Levi HEATH are:

i.        Tryphena HEATH was born 12 NOV 1761 in CT, and died UNKNOWN in Otis (Berkshire), MA. She married Oliver JUDD 15 OCT 1781 in Tyringham, CT. He was born ABT. 1757, and died UNKNOWN.

ii.       Benjamin HEATH was born 12 JUL 1763 in CT, and died 1845 in Locke (Cayuga), NY.

iii.     Hannah HEATH was born 30 APR 1767 in CT, and died UNKNOWN. She married Aaron PRENTICE. He was born ABT. 1762, and died UNKNOWN.

iv.      Solomon HEATH was born 18 MAR 1769 in CT, and died ABT. 1845 in Locke (Cayuga), NY. He married Sarah BATTLE ABT. 1797 in Tyringham, CT, daughter of Ithiel BATTLE and Kezia TAYLOR. She was born 27 SEP 1781 in Tyringham, MA, and died 18 DEC 1858.

3.           v.       Eunice HEATH was born 2 JAN 1771 in Sandisfield, MA, and died 23 APR 1845 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY. She married Deodatus JEFFERS 1792, son of David Jeffers DEODATUS. He was born 20 DEC 1766 in Sheffield, MA, and died 14 APR 1854 in Hadley (Saratoga), NY.

vi.      Ira HEATH was born 15 AUG 1772 in Sandisfield, MA, and died 14 MAR 1837 in Corinth (Saratoga), NY. He married Mary JEFFERS ABT. 1793. She was born 8 OCT 1768, and died 19 JAN 1853.

vii.     Levi HEATH was born 14 JUN 1774 in Sandisfield, MA, and died 28 APR 1848 in Corinth (Saratoga), NY. He married Lucy LINDSAY 25 JUN 1801. She was born 1783, and died 3 JUL 1855.

viii.   Rosanna HEATH was born 14 AUG 1776 in Standisfield, CT, and died UNKNOWN. She married Samuel HALL 1794. He was born ABT. 1771, and died UNKNOWN.

 

 

————————————————————————

Ahnentafel, Generation No. 4

————————————————————————

 

12.       Isaac HEATH was born 24 JUL 1705 in Framingham, MA, and died SEP 1782 in (Tolland), CT. He was the son of 24. Isaac HEATH and 25. Rachel READ.

 

13.       Elizabeth SCRIPTURE was born ABT. 1708 in Enfield, CT, and died 19 FEB 1773 in (Tolland), CT. She was the daughter of 26. John SCRIPTURE and 27. Abigail UTLEY.

Children of Elizabeth SCRIPTURE and Isaac HEATH are:

i.        Elizabeth HEATH was born 6 OCT 1729 in Enfield, CT, and died UNKNOWN.

ii.       Abigail HEATH was born 2 JUN 1731 in Enfield, CT, and died 21 FEB 1813 in Belchertown, MA. She married John WARD 27 MAR 1748 in (Tolland), CT, son of William WARD and Rachel HUMPHREY. He was born 9 NOV 1716 in Union, CT, and died 1800 in Belchertown, MA.

iii.     Rachel HEATH was born 6 DEC 1734 in Stafford, CT, and died UNKNOWN.

iv.      Isaac HEATH was born 26 DEC 1736 in Stafford, CT, and died UNKNOWN. He married Hanna CHARLTON 11 MAR 1763 in Stafford, CT. She was born ABT. 1741, and died 14 APR 1785 in (Tolland), CT.

v.       Relief HEATH was born 7 NOV 1738 in Stafford, CT, and died UNKNOWN.

vi.      Daniel Sr. HEATH was born 6 MAY 1740 in Stafford (Tolland), CT, and died 14 DEC 1805 in Cambridge, (Washington), NY. He married Anna UNKNOWN ABT. 1760. She was born ABT. 1740, and died 17 FEB 1827 in Cambridge, CT.

vii.     Benjamin HEATH was born 4 SEP 1741 in Stafford, CT, and died UNKNOWN.

6.           viii.   Levi HEATH was born 28 APR 1743 in Stafford, CT, and died 27 AUG 1818 in New Marlborough, MA. He married Abigail UNKNOWN ABT. 1760 in CT. She was born ABT. 1748 in Sandisfield, CT, and died BET. 1776 – 1779. He married Abigail ORTON 12 MAY 1779 in Tyringham, MA. She was born 3 SEP 1751 in Farmington, CT, and died UNKNOWN.

ix.      Samuel HEATH was born 2 SEP 1744 in Stafford, CT, and died 15 DEC 1744 in Stafford, CT.

x.       Samuel HEATH was born 1745 in Mansfield, CT, and died 17 SEP 1829 in Sandisfield, CT. He married Mary HEATH 22 OCT 1767 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT. She was born 1751, and died 25 MAR 1829 in Sandisfield, CT.

xi.      Cibel (Sybil) HEATH was born 3 MAY 1747 in (Tolland), CT, and died UNKNOWN.

xii.     Betty HEATH was born 8 MAR 1749 in (Tolland), CT, and died 25 FEB 1826 in Hartford, NY. She married Ithamer CLOUGH 8 NOV 1774 in Stafford, CT. He was born 1750, and died 7 MAY 1843 in Hartford, NY.

xiii.   Phineas HEATH was born 8 AUG 1751 in (Tolland), CT, and died ABT. 1809. He married Hannah UNKNOWN BEF. 21 JAN 1771. She was born ABT. 1751, and died UNKNOWN.

xiv.    Simeon HEATH was born 22 OCT 1753 in (Tolland), CT, and died UNKNOWN. He married Joanna EDSON 27 APR 1780 in Tolland, CT. She was born ABT. 1758, and died UNKNOWN.

xv.     Rueben HEATH was born 6 JUL 1755 in (Tolland), CT, and died UNKNOWN.

 

 

————————————————————————

Ahnentafel, Generation No. 5

————————————————————————

 

24.       Isaac HEATH was born 23 JUL 1683 in Roxbury, MA, and died 8 JUL 1749 in (Tolland), CT. He was the son of 48. Isaac HEATH and 49. Ann FISHER.

 

25.       Rachel READ was born 19 JUN 1682 in Sudbury, MA, and died UNKNOWN. She was the daughter of 50. Thomas Jr. READ and 51. Mary GOODRICH.

 

Children of Rachel READ and Isaac HEATH are:

12.         i.        Isaac HEATH was born 24 JUL 1705 in Framingham, MA, and died SEP 1782 in (Tolland), CT. He married Elizabeth SCRIPTURE ABT. 1728 in CT, daughter of John SCRIPTURE and Abigail UTLEY. She was born ABT. 1708 in Enfield, CT, and died 19 FEB 1773 in (Tolland), CT. He married Hannah UNKNOWN AFT. 1773. She was born ABT. 1751, and died UNKNOWN.

ii.       Ebenezer HEATH was born 31 MAY 1707 in Framingham, MA, and died 10 MAR 1798 in Willington, (Tolland), CT. He married Lydia UTLEY 18 SEP 1728 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT. She was born ABT. 1712, and died UNKNOWN. He married Dorcas SLAUGHTER 5 NOV 1753 in Willington, Tolland County, CT, daughter of Anthony SLAUGHTER and Mary UNKNOWN. She was born ABT. 1727, and died 19 APR 1805.

iii.     Ann HEATH was born 16 SEP 1709 in Framingham, MA, and died UNKNOWN.

iv.      Rachel HEATH was born 10 MAR 1715 in Framingham, MA, and died UNKNOWN. She married William BEAL 16 NOV 1730 in Willington, (Tolland), CT. He was born ABT. 1710, and died UNKNOWN.

v.       Thankful HEATH was born 5 JUL 1717 in Framingham, MA, and died ABT. 1753. She married Daniel MARKHAM 14 NOV 1745 in Stafford, CT. He was born 3 NOV 1704 in Middletown, (Middlesex), CT, and died 16 MAR 1786 in Tyringham, MA.

vi.      Martha HEATH was born 22 MAY 1719 in Framingham, MA, and died UNKNOWN.

vii.     Benjamin HEATH was born 21 APR 1720 in Framingham, MA, and died 16 SEP 1807 in Sandisfield, MA. He married Amy SCRIPTURE 10 MAY 1748 in Tolland, CT, daughter of John SCRIPTURE and Mary EATON. She was born 26 JUN 1732 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT, and died 29 MAR 1758 in Stafford, CT. He married Gillian UNKNOWN 3 JAN 1760 in Tyringham, MA. She was born ABT. 1725, and died 21 AUG 1797 in Tyringham, MA.

viii.   Joseph HEATH was born 20 JUL 1723 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT, and died NOV 1802 in Cambridge, NY. He married Sarah SCRIPTURE 3 NOV 1741 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT, daughter of John SCRIPTURE and Abigail UTLEY. She was born 15 JUL 1723, and died 17 FEB 1815.

 

26.       John SCRIPTURE was born ABT. 1688 in Groton, MA, and died 24 JUL 1779 in Coventry (Tolland), CT. He was the son of 52. Samuel SCRIPTURE and 53. Elizabeth KNAPP.

 

27.       Abigail UTLEY was born 13 JAN 1692 in Stonington, CT, and died 1728 in CT.

Children of Abigail UTLEY and John SCRIPTURE are:

13.         i.        Elizabeth SCRIPTURE was born ABT. 1708 in Enfield, CT, and died 19 FEB 1773 in (Tolland), CT. She married Isaac HEATH ABT. 1728 in CT, son of Isaac HEATH and Rachel READ. He was born 24 JUL 1705 in Framingham, MA, and died SEP 1782 in (Tolland), CT.

ii.       Sarah SCRIPTURE was born 15 JUL 1723, and died 17 FEB 1815. She married Joseph HEATH 3 NOV 1741 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT, son of Isaac HEATH and Rachel READ. He was born 20 JUL 1723 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT, and died NOV 1802 in Cambridge, NY.

 

————————————————————————

Ahnentafel, Generation No. 6

————————————————————————

 

48.       Isaac HEATH was born 10 MAY 1655 in Roxbury, MA, and died 22 DEC 1684 in Roxbury, MA. He was the son of 96. Isaac HEATH and 97. Mary DAVIS.

 

49.       Ann FISHER was born 22 JAN 1661 in Dedham, MA, and died UNKNOWN. She was the daughter of 98. Cornelius FISHER and 99. Leah HEATON.

Children of Ann FISHER and Isaac HEATH are:

i.        Ann HEATH was born 12 NOV 1681 in Roxbury, MA, and died 17 NOV 1681 in Roxbury, MA.

24.         ii.       Isaac HEATH was born 23 JUL 1683 in Roxbury, MA, and died 8 JUL 1749 in (Tolland), CT. He married Rachel READ ABT. 1704, daughter of Thomas Jr. READ and Mary GOODRICH. She was born 19 JUN 1682 in Sudbury, MA, and died UNKNOWN.

 

50.       Thomas Jr. READ was born ABT. 1653 in Sudbury, MA, and died AFT. 1733 in Oxford, MA. He was the son of 100. Thomas Sr. READ and 101. Katharine UNKNOWN.

 

51.       Mary GOODRICH was born 15 DEC 1650 in Wethersfield, CT, and died 2 OCT 1724 in Sudbury, MA.

Child of Mary GOODRICH and Thomas Jr. READ is:

25.         i.        Rachel READ was born 19 JUN 1682 in Sudbury, MA, and died UNKNOWN. She married Isaac HEATH ABT. 1704, son of Isaac HEATH and Ann FISHER. He was born 23 JUL 1683 in Roxbury, MA, and died 8 JUL 1749 in (Tolland), CT.

 

52.       Samuel SCRIPTURE was born 1662 in ENG, and died BET. 1720 – 1728 in Groton, MA.

 

53.       Elizabeth KNAPP was born 21 FEB 1655 in Watertown, MA, and died 1720 in Groton, MA. She was the daughter of 106. James KNAPP and 107. Elizabeth WARREN.

Children of Elizabeth KNAPP and Samuel SCRIPTURE are:

i.        Samuel SCRIPTURE was born 1675, and died UNKNOWN.

ii.       Elizabeth SCRIPTURE was born 1677, and died UNKNOWN.

iii.     Mary SCRIPTURE was born 7 FEB 1681 in Groton (Middlesex), MA, and died 29 JUN 1761. She married Eleazer LAWRENCE. He was born 28 FEB 1674, and died 9 MAR 1754.

iv.      Sarah SCRIPTURE was born 1682, and died UNKNOWN.

v.       Anna SCRIPTURE was born 1685, and died 1758.

vi.      Abigail SCRIPTURE was born 1687, and died UNKNOWN.

26.         vii.     John SCRIPTURE was born ABT. 1688 in Groton, MA, and died 24 JUL 1779 in Coventry (Tolland), CT. He married Abigail UTLEY 15 MAY 1712 in Coventry, (Tolland), CT. She was born 13 JAN 1692 in Stonington, CT, and died 1728 in CT. He married Mary EATON 26 DEC 1728, daughter of William EATON and Mary BURNET. She was born ABT. 1693, and died 20 JUL 1780 in Coventry (Tolland), CT.

viii.   Deborah SCRIPTURE was born ABT. 1690, and died UNKNOWN.

ix.      Ruth SCRIPTURE was born 1696, and died UNKNOWN.

x.       Lydia SCRIPTURE was born 1700, and died UNKNOWN.

 

From: Larry Smith <lsmith@wave.net>

To: <bpdesigns@earthlink.net>

Date: 6/8/2004 10:43:17 PM

Subject: Way back tree

 

The tree is wonderful.   How accurate do you think it is?

 

I wonder who did the tracing?   What is “Unknown”?   Or the “Unnamed”?

 

Will you be able to supply your descending tree info for the Smith list?

 

I am glad that Ralph was able to get Garret’s info typed up. I asked him

if he would. It sure adds to the info profile on the guy.

 

Larry

——————

 

From: “Beverly Pinelli” <bpdesigns@earthlink.net>

Reply-To: bpdesigns@earthlink.net

Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004

To: “Larry Smith” <lsmith@wave.net>

Subject: RE: Way back tree

 

-Accuracy?

Really hard to determine, since sources are not

quoted beyond those that can be documented, but taken from history.

 

-Who did all the tracing?

Several researchers have been doing in-depth studies for many years.

The bulk of the Smith research was done for his Smith cousin by Leon

Stewart.

 

-Unknown/unnamed are words researchers use when they have no information on that person.

Descending Tree info. is so extensive(126 pages), I need to break it into

two parts.

I’m working on that now. I’ll send you the .doc parts as I complete them.

 

I’m always grateful for Ralph’s input.  I’m really glad I found him.

 

Another Bennett Cousin has shared information;  Janet Tacey.

Her Grandmother and Grandma Smith were Cousins.

She honors her husband’s request not to post her information on the web,

but has given approval to share it with family.

I will try to plug in her information as I go when sending you the tree information.  She and Ralph have also been in contact.

 

Inquest into the death of Garret Bennett – November 1862. 

 

Ralph Bennett – Jun 7, 2004  

 

Categories: Bennett/Jeffers

 

Subject:   Garrett Bennett; murdered at Follensby Pond Jr.

Location of document:  Drawer   #   57

Basement level

FranklinCounty Courthouse

Malone, FranklinCounty, New York

 

Compiled by: Ralph Bennett; 33 Leona Lane, SaranacLake, FranklinCounty, New

York   12983   on June 1004

—————————————————————————————————

This history is from Ralph Bennett – it is an inquest into the murder of our G.G Grandfather. It adds information we didn’t know.

 

A woman friend of Ralph’s discovered this while searching old faded records for something else. It took Ralph weeks to decipher the faded writings.

 

Bev

 

————————————

 

 

Page   # 1

State of New York:  CountyFranklin

 

Garett Bennett was murdered while his son, Emerick Bennett, was serving in the Civil War.

 

Examination of witnesses produced sworn and examined on an inquest held upon the body of Garett Bennett at the house of Thomas O’Neil in the town of Brighton county and State aforesaid on the 27th day of December 1862 before me Sidney P. Bates one of the coroners in and for the said County of Franklin and Leonard S./ Green, Julius Quarters, R. A. Avery, John Ricketson, Henry R. Conger, Edward Rork, George Ricketson.   Henry R. Conger, Edward Rork, George Ricketson, John Otis, William J. Gostlaw, R. Ricketson and Herman Wilcox good and lawful men of the said county duly sworn upon their oaths to inquire into all the circumstances attending the death of said Garrett Bennett and by who the same was produced and in what matter and when and where the said Garrett Bennett came to his death.   The following witnesses were produced sworn and examined and did testify

 

Page   # 2 & 3

as follows:

 

Apollos A. Smith  (Paul Smith)

 

Being produced sworn and examined testifies as follows:   I reside in the town of Brighton at Follonsbee Pond.   I have resided there four or five years.   I knew Garrett Bennett.   I have been acquainted with him something like six years.   I recognize the body which was been viewed by the jury as the body of Mr. Bennett. Mr. Bennett has spent most of his time at “Big Clear” and “Settle” Ponds where he hunted and fished for a livelihood.   I saw him at this place the last I saw him.   I think it must have been five or six weeks since he was there apparently well and of sound mind so far as I observed. I do not know that Mr. Bennett had any difficulty quarrel or feud with any of the people in this vicinity.   I have had frequent business transaction with him.   I have bought a great fish of him.   His character

 

Page   #   4

 

so far as I knew stood well enough.   He was so far as I knew him a quit peaceable man–quite inoffensive.   He was a man who had the habit of drinking a little too much sometimes and once in a great while would get intoxicated.   I was at the Bennett shanty at Follonsbee Pond about a week after he left here.   He was not at the shanty.   I did not see him anywhere around.   I went there to catch some fish for a Mr. Keough of New York.   I stayed there over night.   I had fished till night and then went to the shanty expecting to find Bennett there.   There was a little snow.   His dog was outside the shanty but there was no appearance of any man being there since the snow fell.   There was in the shanty some four or five deer, five or six deer skins, a table skin, some jerked venison, some bedding, cooking utensils, some butter in a pail–the pail was half full, a juice of brandy

 

 

 

 

Page   # 5   & 6

 

on the top of the pail, some venison and his cooking utensils on the table.

 

Eugene White

 

Being duly sworn and examined testifies as follows: I reside in Brighton.   I live with Mr. O’Neil.   I have been there two years.   I was acquainted with Mr. Bennett.   I have known him about two years and a half.   I was with him last on the 20th day of November.   I remember it was the 20th because he went from here on that day to the pond called Follonsbee Jr.   He was well at the time.   There was a young man who went there with him from this place.   The young man’s name was Elias Hall.   They left there in company about 8 or 9 o’clock in the morning.   Hall was going through to Mr. McCollom’s and assisted Bennett in caring his stuff.   He carried in 14 lbs. of flour and a pail of butter.   Hall returned the next day.   I saw him on his return.   He said he did not stay with Bennett overnight but staid at McCollom’s

 

Page   # 7 & 8

 

The next I heard said about Bennett.   Mr. A. A. Smith said he had been to his shanty but Bennett was not there.   When Mr. Bennett was here last he wanted me to hunt with him.   Accordingly about three weeks after he left here I and William McCarter went over there.   The distance across the mountain is about three miles.   This was after Smith had been there.   We arrive at his shanty in the afternoon of the 11th day of December. We found no one at the shanty and from appearances we thought no one had been there for some time.   There was snow on the ground and the foxes had tracked around and near the shanty.   We went into the shanty and found his stuff just about as he had carried it from here.   There were no tracks of animals or man about the shanty but only fox and rabbit tracks.   We started out on the pond and thought we would go around the pond and find his boat.   We went partly down the pond – saw a deer behind us turned back and

 

Page   # 9 & 10

 

finding it late came home the shortest way.   On the 15th we went over again to the shanty.   We found it as we had left it.   There were two of us together myself and Elias Hall.   McCarter who was going to hunt with us took another road and came across the pond or rather to cross the pond as we came out of the shanty after eating our dinner.   He hailed us and we went to meet him.   He called our attention to a boat turned bottom side up in the water near the shore on the opposite side of the pond to the shanty – about fifty rods from the shanty.   The shanty is on the east side of the pond and the boat was on the west side of the pond.   We all went to the boat.   It was at the mouth of a little brook and was not frozen in.   We took the boat out of the water and searched in the water near where it was to see if we could find Mr. Bennett.   We did not find him and had given up the search there.   I went another only a few feet across a small point of land and I found Mr. Bennett lying with his feet on the shore

 

Page   #11 & 12

 

and his face and hands and front of his chest is the water.   His face was downward. We turned the body over and blood running called our attention to a hole in his head near the ear.   McCarter said, “He had laid there too long. There was a hole in his head.”   We laid him on the point of land and turned his boat over him and laid a large pole on the top of the boat – returned to the shanty took our things and returned home and told the people what we had found and what we had done.   A week ago today we went back together with four others and found every thing just as we had left it.   We took the body and brought it into this place and this is all I know of his death or the circumstances attending it.   I have never had any difficulty with Mr. Bennett and have always been on good terms with him. I never hunted with him.

Eugene White

 

Sworn and subscribed before me this 27th day of December 1863.   Sidney P. Bates, Coroner

 

Page   # 13 & 14

 

Elias E. Hall

 

Being produced sworn and examined testifies as follows: I live in the town of Brighton. I have lived here five years.   I was acquainted with Mr. Bennett.   I have known him for two years.   I saw him at this place on or about the twentieth of November.   I went back with him to Follonsbee Jr.   When he went back at that time.   He hired me to carry over some stuff for him.   He had some flour, some bread, and some butter.   He had about fifty pounds of flour — two loaves of bread and a six quart pail about two thirds full of butter.   We took turns in carrying the things.   It is about two miles over to the pond.   We left here between 9 & 10 o’clock A.M.   We arrived at the shanty between 12 & 1 o’clock P.M.   I remained at the shanty about an hour and a half.   We ate dinner.   We ate part of one of the loaves say about 2/3 of it and some of the butter.   We took the butter off the top of that in the pail

 

Page   # 15 & 16

 

We also carried his gun in from Jenkin’s.   I carried it a part of the way.   I discharged the gun after we arrived at the pond.   Mr. Bennett reloaded it and discharged it at a chunk in the pond.   I went from the shanty to Mr. McCollom’s.   Mr. Bennett went with me about fifty rods to show me the road.   I arrived at McCollom’s just at night and remained there until the next day in the afternoon when I came back on the regular road.   I found a chance to ride a part of the way with Mr. Skiff.   It is about 10 miles home the way we came.   I never saw Mr. Bennett again until he was found by the side of the pond on the fifteenth of this month.   I was there present.   Eugene White and William McCarter were with me. Eugene White found the body.   It lay with the feet on the land or bushes with hands and face and part of the chest in the water.   We saw blood running and this called our attention to a hole in the head.   We looked

 

Page   # (no # given)

 

at it but I did not think anything about it.   It did no come into my mind that the man had been shot.   We took him from where he lay on to the little knoll of ridge of dry ground and put the boat over the body and secured it and came away—returned home and told what we had found.   I saw no one about the pond on the day I went in with Bennett.   I saw no one on the day we found the body–nor did I see any tracks.   Mr. Bennett has stopped at our house a good many times and was always civil.   We did not have much talk going in.   He did not pay me.   He said he had no change but said he would pay me some time when he came out.   He said nothing about having any trouble with any one.   I went out there again when the men went to carry in the body.   We found the body as it was left.   When I went in with Bennett there were in the shanty ten deer; some only saddles and some

 

 

 

 

Page   # (no # given)

 

whole deer.   Three or four deer skins some tallow – a table – some jerked venison in two tubs – and some on a rack overhead, and two beavers tails up overhead.   The flour and butter and a loaf and a third of bread.   When I went there with Eugene White there were those saddles and two whole deer.   There was some jerked venison these I saw when first there.   It was in a bag and in a tub.   The bag would hold nearly two bushels and it was nearly full.   When I was there the first time there was a skin on the smoke house.   I found about a third of a loaf of bread, only a small quantity of the butter was gone.   The flour was in a bag and I think had not been disturbed after I left him.   He said he was intending to get his deer out soon as he could do as to sell them.   We did not find his gun or axe either time we were there.   He bought his bread of Mrs. O’Neil.   These were two loaves weighing three pounds together.   He asked me to stay and hunt with him

 

Page   # 17 & 18

 

I could not do it because I had one of Mr. McCollom’s dogs and I was going to take it back to him.

His mark     “X’     (Elias E. Hall)

 

Sworn and subscribed before me this 29th day of December 1863.

Sidney P. Bates, Coroner

 

A. C. McCollom

 

Being produced sworn and examined testifies as follows: I resided in the north third of the town of Brighton on the Harkness place which lies on the old “North West Bay Road”. I could scarcely say that I knew Mr. Bennett.   He staid at my house one night but left in the morning before we were up.   I know Elias E. Hall.   Hall promised to bring my dog home and I think he did so, but he came with him in my absence.   The reason I have for thinking so are that he said he would and on my return home I found the dog there and my wife told me that Hall brought him.   That Hall said he was coming to help Bennett in with some stuff

 

Page   # 19 & 20

 

And being so near he came over with the dog.   I have no particular mean of fixing the time.   I think however in the latter part of November.   The first I knew of Bennett being at Follonsbee Jr. was in October.   I was at Apollos Smith’s and he told me Bennett had moved over there bag and baggage.   I never knew of his being there before.   Mr. Carrier, Thomas Pearlman and myself have done most of the hunting in the vicinity of Follonsbee Jr. for the last seven years.   We built the shanty there.   Carrier and Pearlman have left the country and live in Stockholm.   Bennett said nothing to me about taking the shanty.   Is not common for a hunter to take possession of a shanty without saying something about it.   There has been no one else to my knowledge hunting in that vicinity this fall.   The shanty is about four miles from my house.   The first time I stopped perhaps five minutes.   I did not go in.   There were two dogs there–one chained

 

Page   # 21

 

to the door, the other bull dog and they did not seem overly willing to have one come in and consequently I did not go in.   The next time I went there was the day that Hall brought home my dog.   There was no one at the shanty on that occasion.   At that time I went inside.   I saw just about what others have described.   I did not count the deer but I should think there were eight or ten in all.   I took away with me some window sash for which I went and I have not been there since.   The situation of Mr. Bennett as a hunter was not good.   He was spoken of as being lawless.   Harvey Averill said the most about him–more than I ever heard any one else say.   I know nothing more about the matter in any way.   I know old Bill Edwards.   He was out there in October but left and I was told he had gone to Plumadore Pond.

A. C. McCollom

 

Subscribed and sworn before me this 27th day of December 1863.

Sidney P. Bates, Coroner

 

Page   # 22 & 23

 

Freeman S. Lyon

 

Being produced sworn and examined testifies as follows: I reside in the town of Franklin. I am a physician and surgeon by profession.   I have been engaged in the practice of my profession about 14 years.   I am in the habit of making post mortem examinations. I knew Garrett Bennett when alive.   I saw him last nearly a year ago.   I recognize the body viewed as the body of Bennett.   I have made an examination of that body.   I judge from that examination that the deceased passed to his death from a gun shot wound entering the head at the lower edge of the sight temporal bone above one fourth of an inch anterior to the ear passing in its course rather below the base of the brain destroying in its passage that part of the brain called the “pons varolii” and the “medulla oblongata” and emerging just below the left ear.   The result of such a wound would be instant death.   The most instantaneous possible.   I found no other marks or wounds upon the body.   I do not think such

 

Page   # 24 & 25

 

a wound could be made by a man upon himself–not with a rifle.  The wound would not pass so directly through the head if self inflicted.

 

F. S Lyon

 

Sworn and subscribed before me the 29th day of December 1862.

Sidney P. Bates, Coroner

 

Apollos Smith’s testimony continued:   see page 4

 

I remained over night.   I ate at the shanty of my own provisions.   I though perhaps Mr. Bennett had gone to McCollom’s.   There were no appearances of his having been at the shanty for some time.   The dog was exceedingly pleased to see me and came out here with me.   I stopped at Jenkins and told Mrs. Jenkins that Bennett was not at the shanty–that his dog had come out with me and that I could not drive him back and asked her to tell Bennett of it when he came out.   I have not been there since and know no more concerning the death of the deceased or of the finding of the body.

 

Page   # 26 & 27

 

Bennett was called on old hermit.   I never knew anything bad of him.   We have up in this region a sort of “hunters code” and it is expected that hunters will observe it.   I never knew Bennett to violate it but I have heard him accused of doing so.   I have heard him accused of killing dogs, of taking deer driven by other hunters’ dogs, of burning boats belonging to others and of taking fish from other’s nets.   My dogs have been to Big Clear and have been cared of by him.   My boats have been on the pond and have never been harmed by him.   I have heard Bennett say that he was wrongfully accused of these things–that others stole from him while he stole from no one.   Stephen Turner and Jerry Manly were those I have heard say the most about Bennett.   Manly had gone home before Bennett went into the pond from here.   Turner and others came out from Bay Pond the day Bennett was here and went as far as to Bloomingdale.   I have also

 

Page   # 28

 

heard Edwards talk about Bennett but I never heard him make any threats against him. Edwards left my place in September and went as I understood over to Mr. McCollom’s.   I have neither seen him nor heard from him since.   I never heard Bennett   (Note: The name Bennett probably should have been Edwards) say he would shoot old Bennett as soon as he would a dog if he found him on his hunting grounds.   It is four miles from Follosbee Jr. to McCollom’s.

 

Apollos A. Smith

 

Sworn and subscribed before me this 27th day of December 1863.

Sidney P. Bates, Coroner

 

Eugene White recalled: I saw Mr. Bennett’s gloves at the time I found the body.   They lay nearly back of him on the ground and a little to the right–one about two feet from his right foot – the other more directly behind him at about four feet farther back.

The mink trap was about two rods back of him.

 

Eugene White

 

Sworn   and examination and subscribed before me this 27th day of

December 1862.   Sidney P. Bates, Corner

 

Page   # 29 & 30

 

State of New York, FranklinCounty

 

An inquest for the people of the State of New York at the house of Thomas O’Neil in the town of Brighton in the County of Franklin on the 27th day of December 1862 before me Sidney P. Bates one of the coroners in and for the said county upon the view of the body of Garrett Bennett their and there lying dead upon the oaths of George Ricketson, Rosewell A. Avery, John Ricketson, William I. Costelow, Leonard S. Green, Edward Rork, Julius Quarters, Henry Conger, Joshua Otis, and Herman Otis good and lawful men of the said county who being duly sworn to inquire on the part of the people of the State of  New York into all the circumstance attending the death of the said Garrett Bennett and by whom the same was produced and in manner and where and when the said Garrett Bennett came to his death do say that the Garrett Bennett was found lying dead on the shore of the pond called Follonsbee Jr.

 

Page   # 31 & 32

 

His body lying in the water of said pond and partly on the beach there of and that the body when found as aforesaid appeared to have been that with a rifle or musket ball through the head.   The ball entering near the right ear and passing out near and below the left ear seeming causing the instant death of said Bennett and that the said wound was caused and produced by some person to this jury unknown.   In witness where of as well the said coroner as the jurors aforesaid have to this inquest set their hands and seals on the day and date aforesaid–Leonard S. Green, Julius Quarters, R. A. Avery, John Ricketson, Henry R. Conger, Edward Rork, Sidney P. Bates, George Ricketson, Joshua Otis, William Costelow, Herman Wilcox

 

I do hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct statement and account of an examination taken by and before me as above stated and of the testimony of the several witnesses produced sworn and examined therefore.

Giving under my hand this 27th day of December.

 

Page   # 22

 

Garrett Bennett, inquest, filed Nov. 14, 1863

——————————————————–

 

 

Note:   Some witness dates are given as 1863, but probably should be 1862.   Follonsbee Pond Jr. is today spelled Follensby Pond Junior Pond and is located in the Town of Santa Clara, Franklin County, New York.  The land surrounding the pond is privately owned.  At one time the Rockefeller family owned the entire area, but today it has been divided and the area around the pond is known as Ross Park.  Ross Park, I believe, is owned by the Dupont family.

 

My home in Saranac Lake, New York is located about 20 miles southeast of Follensby Pond Jr.

 

 

Typed by Ralph Bennett – June, 2

A quick search of the Net produced:

 

William James Stillman, painter and journalist, spent the summer of 1857 painting near RaquetteLake. The next year he returned with a group of friends to a spot on Follensby Pond that became known as the Philosophers Camp. The group included Ralph Waldo Emerson and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.’s brother John.

 

“I was a counselor at ASTC (Adirondack Swim and Trip Camp) for two years, one in camp and one as a trip leader. I remember heading down to the lake in the morning with the other polar bears and going for a swim, no matter how cold the water. My strongest impressions are from the trips taken in my second year, climbing trailless peaks (and writing limericks in the register books at the top), canoeing in the clear waters of Follensby Pond.”      Phil Heinrich

 

Many Adirondack trails remain little known and used, but are interesting destinations for hikers with a sense of adventure. The routes are quiet, clearly marked and well maintained for the hiker. Within these areas you will find some of the region’s best trails and paths, which are appealing for all ages and abilities. This month’s featured hike is Jenkins, a small mountain that packs a mighty view… From the knob you can see Follensby Jr. Pond to the north, St.RegisLake just south of west, TupperLake, and the HighPeaks from the Sewards around to Whiteface. The return trip, retracing your steps, takes little more than two hours, but pause frequently to discover what you may have missed on the hike up.

 

Follensby Pond has 22 miles of shoreline, 14,000 surface acres, significant wetlands, and northern hardwood forests.

 

The earliest known settlers in Brighton, New York, was Moses Follensby.. The date of Follensby’s locating is unknown, but he disappeared in 1823, without having left any impress upon the town except the giving of his name to two or three of its waters. Regis Indian, frequented the woods and waters of Brighton at an early time, and found rare good hunting and fishing

 

Apollos A. Smith, familiarly known the world over as “Paul,” came to Brighton in 1859 from the vicinity of Loon Lake, where he had located ten years earlier. He was born in Vermont August 20, 1825, and previous to removal to the Adirondacks had been a boatman on Lake Champlain. At Loon Lake he conducted a small hotel for a time, and then the house called Hunters’ Home. In Brighton Mr. Smith bought fifty acres of land on what was then known as Follensby Pond, but now as the Lower St. Regis, for three hundred dollars, the grantor reserving the pine suitable for saw logs. He erected a primitive hotel building, and from time to time during the next twenty years added nearly a thousand acres to his original purchase at a cost of about five thousand five hundred dollars. In the meantime the original hotel building, which had been little more than a shack, had given place to a much larger and finer structure, with boat houses and other appurtenant buildings, the whole comprising the finest accommodations for sportsmen and pleasure seekers then known in all the Adirondack region. To these many other and large improvements have since been made. Many factors entered into this great development, not the least of which was Mr. Smith’s personality. An attractive location, the fine fishing that the surrounding waters afforded, and a table and general appointments that equaled those of the best city hostelries all counted for success, of course, but without Paul himself the establishment could not have so prospered and so gained and held the affection of guests..

 

Thus Paul Smiths gained a world-wide fame, and gave an enjoyment to its guests that convinced them that there was no other place like it, and brought them back summer after summer to delight in its homelike atmosphere, and to build up among themselves friendships that endured. From the mere fifty acres of shore front and encompassing forest with which the resort started, it has grown to be a private park of thirty thousand acres, and a hotel with annex, casino, cottages, workshops, etc., that can accommodate five hundred guests.

 

 

Bennett Funeral Notices – from Addie Smith Wold – Very formal with gold ink overlaid on a black background. They are beginning to fade – the gold ink is rubbing off.

 

 

IN LOVING REMEMBERANCE

 

OF

 

Elmer C. Bennett,

 

Died April 22, 1912.

Age 52 years

 

A precious one from us has gone,

A voice we loved is stilled:

A place is vacant in our home

Which never can be filled.

God in His wisdom has recalled,

The boon his love has given,

And though the body slumbers here,

The soul is safe in Heaven.

Copyright 1898 by H. F. Wendell, Leipaic, O.

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A handwritten letter written by Grandma Gertrude Bennett Smith,

 

December 16, 1975, to grandson Larry Smith.  Age 90.  (b. 1885 – d. 1981)

 

Dear Larry:

 

(a sample of what my eyesight does to me)

 

Can’t tell you much about Emerick (Bennett).  (Everybody called him Em.) He had one brother and one sister that I know of.  Jack married the twin sister of Em’s wife.

 

I do not know the sister’s name. Her husband had a logging camp in the Adirondack Mountains. My father and grandfather worked there in the winter. (Elmer Cortis & Emerick) Don’t know if they had any children.  Jack had a homestead near Em.

 

There were six children in that family:  Atwood, German, Licriha, Addie, Will and Sid.  They called German – Germ. That was before they discovered the bug.

 

Jack had 6 children – 4 boys and 2 girls.  Lesley – born 1866, Orpha – 1863, Jefferson – 1869, Celia – 1878.  The two girls married brothers named Harris. I don’t know their first names. They all stayed in N.Y. Lesley died in 1899 – left three children.  Jefferson only had one child and she married Lesley’s only boy. (A cousin marrying a cousin.) I don’t know how many the Harrieses had.

 

All of the pictures of Mother’s family and my marriage certificate were in the box we left in Canada.  If Chester had any documents they were probably on the dock in Manila waiting to be shipped when the Japanese bombed Manila.  Bonnie had left, but their freight was waiting to be shipped.

 

My mother had five sisters and one brother – Anna, Cilly, Rose, Elizabeth, Julia and Will.  They all stayed in the east except Will and we lost track of him after grandma died in 1887.

 

I hope you can make something out of this.  It is a mess – but it is the best I can do. Thanks for the pictures.  You have a couple of sweet children.  They are fortunate they have parents who love them and will train them right. I didn’t get any pictures from Lloyd and Helen. I shouldn’t complain.  I didn’t send out any Christmas cards this year.  I think when you read this you will understand why.

 

I’m so thankful that you two boys have such sweet Christian wives.  The Lord has been good to you. He rewards those who are faithful. I’m also thankful that you both are schoolteachers.  We certainly need Christian teachers in the public schools.

 

God bless and guide you always.

 

Grandma (G. Smith)

 

———————–

 

Letter from Aunt Addie Wold to nephew Larry Smith, February 10, 1979

 

Hi, there, dear people!

 

Unaccustomed as I am to writing to you, it’s hard to know how to begin properly.  I’m sure I would have written to you long ago were it not for my guilt. I’ve been so pokey with the family history that I couldn’t face you – even on paper.  You’ve been so very kind and patient, sending so many interesting bits you’ve been uncovering, with nary a word about my negligence.  You’ve shamed me into action.  I finally have dusted off the typewriter and finished compiling all the statistics I have.  I hope they meet specifications.

 

In the re-reading your letters, I discover several questions that I fear I haven’t answered, so I’ll do so now.  The answers will be quite hit-and-miss, but trust they will help fill in some of the gaps.

 

Gertrude’s stepmother, Dora DeLair Patterson Bennett, was a widow, mother of four, Daisy, Alice, and I’m not sure of the names of the other two.  Cora Call Bennett did not go by the name Cora, but by her first name, which was Ida.  Gertrude doesn’t know why Ida’s mother, Julia’s name doesn’t appear on the death certificate.  You asked why Elmer Bennett had no use for his father-in-law, William Call. It was because of W’s abuse and cruelty to Julia.  William dropped out of the picture long before Ida’s death.  We are puzzled about his name being on the d. cert., but after all, he was her father-good or bad.

 

Isn’t strange that both Aaron Victor’s and Gertrude’s mothers were named Ida and that they each had a grandmother Julia!

 

Aunt Addie

—————–

 

William Callwas born either in Vermont or New   York. Apparently he served for a time in the Civil War but deserted and fled to Canada. Several of his kids were born in Canada. May have been married before. Many mysteries about the man remain.

 

———————————————————————–

 

Grandma Gertrude Smith once told about her father, Elmer Cortis Smith, getting into a physical fight with his father-in-law, William Call, apparently while the Bennett family was living in Minnesota. Elmer Cortis was a very mild mannered man, so a fight was out of character for him. Apparently William Call had a way of antagonizing people, even the meek and mild.

 

From Beverly Pinelli – Question re:  Julia Call did not sign Death Certificate, but William did.  Julia Call had died before Ida Cora and her baby.

 

Ida Cora (Call) Bennett’s Mother died about eleven months before her.

 

 

 

 

The way the person transcribed this is a little confusing.

Let me format it a little differently, using Ida.–

 

Name: Ida C. CALL

Age: 14

Estimated birth year: <1866>

Birthplace: New York

Relation: Dau

Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New   York

Occupation: At School

Marital status: Single

Race: White

Gender: Female

Head of household: William CALL

Father’s birthplace: VT

Mother’s birthplace: Canada

 

[ Dau = Daughter ]

 

In the case of the Jacksons,

their relation to the Head of the household of Justus Bennett was listed as;

 

FatherL =  Father-in-Law –    MotherL =  Mother-in-law

 

 

 

 

 

1880 Federal Census

Burke, FranklinCounty, New York

Pages 484-A & 484-B

 

Call, William              42  (1838)       husband  farmer          VT       VT       NY

Julia                   49  (1831)       wife        k. house        Can      Can      Canada

Ida C.                 14 (1866)        dau        at school       NY      VT       Canada

William             11  (1869)       son        at school       Can      VT       Canada

Julia L.                 8  (1872)       dau                              Can      VT       Canada

Lilian                 16  (1864)       dau                              Can      VT       Canada

 

Note:  Could not locate William Call in the 1870 census.  It appears he was living in Canada with his family. Some family sources say he fled to Canada after being drafted into the Civil War.  In other words he deserted his duty.

 

Other Calls in FranklinCounty, New York

 

1880 Federal Census

Constable, FranklinCounty, New York

Page 533-B

 

Call, Stephen              66  (1814)       husband           shoemaker      VT       VT       MA

Elizabeth            68  (1812)       wife                 k. house           NH      NH      NH

 

Page 538-C

Call, Lilly                   16  (1864)                               servant                        NY      NY      NY

Dear Larry,

 

I sent the information as an attachment.  Some how it was entered as an e-mail which is very difficult to understand.  I am sending it to you as an attachment.  VT-VT-NY means the individual was born in Vermont, father born in Vermont, and Mother born in New York.   k. house means keeping house

 

Ralph Bennett

————————————————————-

http://www.civilwarhome.com/desertion.htm

 

Desertion In The Civil War Armies – Union Army

 

In view of the conditions that prevailed in the war department and in the Union army, it is not surprising that desertion was a common fault. Even so the actual extent of it, as shown in the official reports, comes as a distinct shock. Though the determination of the fully number is a bit complicated, the total would seem to have been well over 200,000. From New York there were 44,913 deserters according to the records; from Pennsylvania, 24,050; from Ohio, 18,354. The daily hardships of war, deficiency in arms, forced marches (which sometimes made straggling a necessity for less vigorous men), thirst, suffocating heat, disease, delay in pay, ~ solicitude for family, impatience at the monotony and futility of inactive service, and (though this was not the leading cause) panic on the eve of battle – these were some of the conditioning factors that produced desertion. Many men absented themselves merely through unfamiliarity with military discipline or through the feeling that they should be “restrained by no other legal requirements than those of the civil law governing a free people”; and such was the general attitude that desertion was often regarded “more as a refusal.. – to ratify a contract than as the commission of a grave crime.”

 

The sense of war weariness, the lack of confidence in commanders, and the discouragement of defeat tended to lower the morale of the Union army and to increase desertion. General Hooker estimated in 1863 that 85,000 officers and men had deserted from the Army of the Potomac, while it was stated in December of 1862 that no less than 180,000 of the soldiers listed on the Union muster rolls were absent, with or without leave. Abuse of sick leave or of the furlough privilege was one of the chief means of desertion. Other methods were: slipping to the rear during a battle, inviting capture by the enemy (a method by which honorable service could be claimed), straggling, taking French leave when on picket duty, p retending to be engaged in repairing a telegraph line, et cetera. Some of the deserters went over to the enemy not as captives but as soldiers; others lived in a wild state on the frontier; some turned outlaw or went to Canada; some boldly appeared at home; in some cases deserter gangs, as in western Pennsylvania, formed bandit groups.

 

To suppress desertion the extreme penalty of death was at times applied, especially after 1863; but this meant no more than the selection of a few men as public examples out of many thousands equally guilty. The commoner method was to make public appeals to deserters, promising pardon in case of voluntary return with dire threats to those who failed to return. That desertion did not prevent a man posing after the war as an honorable soldier is evident by a study of pension records. The laws required honorable discharge as a requisite for a pension; but in the case of those charged with desertion Congress passed numerous private and special acts “correcting” the military record.

 

Beverly Pinelli

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mnnorman/Death/death_c.htm

 

I found this in my files.

 

Could the William H Call with a homestead in Minnesota possibly have been

a parent/relative ?   It looks like Ida’s Father and family were still in New York in the 1880 Census.

 

 

1880 CallNY

Line 56

House #141

Family #145

 

Name: William CALL Age: 42 Estimated birth year: <1838> Birthplace: Vermont Relation: Self Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Farmer Marital status: Married Race: White Gender: Male Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: VT Mother’s birthplace: NH

 

Name: Julia CALL Age: 49 Estimated birth year: <1831> Birthplace: Canada Relation: Wife Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Keeping House Marital status: Married Race: White Gender: Female Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: Canada Mother’s birthplace: Canada

 

Name: Lillian CALL Age: 16 Estimated birth year: <1864> Birthplace: Canada Relation: Dau Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Marital status: Single Race: White Gender: Female Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: VT Mother’s birthplace: Canada

 

Name: Ida C. CALL Age: 14 Estimated birth year: <1866> Birthplace: New York Relation: Dau Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: At School Marital status: Single Race: White Gender: Female Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: VT Mother’s birthplace: Canada

 

Name: William CALL Age: 11 Estimated birth year: <1869> Birthplace: Canada Relation: Son Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: At School Marital status: Single Race: White Gender: Male Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: VT Mother’s birthplace: Canada

 

Name: Julia L. CALL Age: 8 Estimated birth year: <1872> Birthplace: Canada Relation: Dau Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Marital status: Single Race: White Gender: Female Head of household: William CALL Father’s birthplace: VT

 

–Julia’s (Jackson) Call’s Parents.  They were also the parents of twin sisters Lucinda  (wife of Justus Bennett) and Lucia (Wife of Emerick Bennett)–

 

- Living in the household of Justus Bennett, Ralph Bennett’s gg Grandfather.

 

Name: William JACKSON Age: 71 Estimated birth year: <1809> Birthplace: ENG Relation: FatherL

Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Boarder Marital status: Married Race: White Gender: Male

Head of household: Juetus (Should be JUSTUS) BENNETT

 

Father’s birthplace: ENG Mother’s birthplace: ENG

 

Name: Sarah JACKSON Age: 69 Estimated birth year: <1811> Birthplace: Vermont Relation: MotherL

 

Home in 1880: Burke, Franklin, New York Occupation: Boarder Marital status: Married Race: White Gender: Female Head of household: Juetus BENNETT Father’s birthplace: NY Mother’s birthplace: CT

 

William Jackson was in Burke Census in 1850, but Ancestry didn’t have the image available.

(missing image)

 

Jackson, William

State: New   York    Year: 1850 County: Franklin Roll:  M432_505  Township:          Burke

Page: 302    Image: 604

 

I wonder if Ralph has this or other Census Records for William Jackson & family?

 

— Beverly Pinelli

 

 

 

I found this on my Civil WAR CD; (Beverly Pinelli)

 

Call, William H.         William H. Call – {CALL}

 

Company:

Rank In: Private

 

Rank Out:

 

Roll-Box: 000551      Roll-Exct: 0020        Roll-Rec: 00002732

 

Allegiance: Union

 

Misc: Caul.

 

Unit: 13 N. Y. H. A.

 

Source: Ancestry CD

 

Interesting, The Company & the “rank out” spaces were left blank.

All the others in the list had those things filled in. (Probably because he deserted and fled to Canada.)

 

13th Regiment Heavy Artillery

 

Organized at New York and mustered in at Elmira, N.Y., by Companies as follows: “A” August 12, 1863. “B” August 29. “C” September 11. “D” at Staten Island, N.Y., August 4, 1863. “E” at FortSchuyler March 10, 1864. “F” February, 1864. “G” March 14. “H” February 18. “I” at Riker’s Island November 10, 1863. “K” at Norfolk, Va., February 21, 1864. “L” June 11, 1864. “M” December, 1863. Companies “A,” “B,” “C,” “D” left State for Norfolk, Va., October 5, 1863. Attached to Defenses of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., and Defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina (1st and 2nd Battalions). 3rd Battalion (Cos. “I,” “K,” “L,” “M”) attached to Naval Brigade as guard on board vessels of war along Atlantic Coast and with James River fleet as Naval Brigade, Army of the James, Companies “A” and “H” attached to 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, May, 1864, to January, 1865, and to Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Va., to June, 1865, participating in Butler’s operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28, 1864. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Fall of Petersburg April 2, 1865. (Co. “D” at Fort Fisher, N. C., January 15, 1865.) Expedition from Suffolk to Murfree’s Depot, N. C., March 10-11, 1865 (Detachment). South Quay March 10. Expedition from Deep Bottom to near Weldon, N. C., March 28-April 11, 1865 (Detachment). Old members and Companies “I,” “K,” “L” and “M” mustered out June 28, 1865. Balance transferred to 6th New York Heavy Artillery July 18, 1865.

 

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 4 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 144 Enlisted men by disease. Total 151.

 

Land Records for Minnesota show the Homesteads listed as:

 

WILLIAM CALL

 

Date: 20 Dec 1877

Location: MN,

Document #: 4692

Serial #: MN2500__. 474

Sale Type: HOMESTEAD

Acres: 80.0000

Meridian or Watershed: 5TH

Parcel: Township 104 N, Range 30 W, Section 10

ELMER BENNETT

 

Date: 23 Jan 1885

Acres: 160.0000

Location: MN,

Serial # MN0340_. 333

Sale type: CASH ENTRY SALE

Acres; 160.0000

Meridian or Watershed: 5th

Parcel: Township 144N, Range 46W, Section 12

 

——————————————————-

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mnnorman/Death/death_c.htm

 

Norman County Minnesota

Death Record Index C

1871-1922

Deceased Name DOD YOD Ind Book Page Line Notes

 

Call, Jullia Dec 5 1888 1 1 25 88

 

Bennett, Ida C. Nov 23 1898 1 1 68 132

 

Bennett, __________ Nov 13 1898 1 1 68 133 Stillborn (baby was unnamed.)

 

The following letter was written by Addie Smith Wold in answer to several questions posed by her nephew, Larry Smith. Written sometime between 1975 and 1979.

 

The Bennetts attended a Baptist church in N.Y. In Minn. there was no Baptist church, so when they could go to church they went to a Methodist.

 

The Minn. schools were not graded, but Gertrude finished at about the 8th grade level.

 

You asked about a trunk that was left behind in Canada.  In one of the moves to one of the homesteads, I’m not sure which one, it was necessary to lighten the load for the sake of the horses, this particular trunk, containing many personal treasurers, along with a little keepsake rocker, was left in the town of Ponoka.

 

The railroad town just north of the homestead was Innisfree.  (Innisfree, village (1991 pop. 254), E Alberta, Canada, 28 mi/45 km W of Vermilion. Dairying; grain; stock.) You said you couldn’t make it out on the tape.

 

The cook stove around which they huddled during a May snowstorm was out in the open.  Had been used the fall before by men cutting hay, and just left there when they went home.

 

Elmer Bennett lived on his own homestead while building the house on Dora’s homestead – 12 miles north.  Grandpa Bennett didn’t do any building on the Smith homestead. It was his wife, Dora’s homestead, twelve miles north of his own homestead.  It was government land on which she had filed a claim. That house he built on that land was the one that burned.  While he was building, the family was living on his own homestead that he had filed on when he first went to Canada.

 

Yes, Uncle Chester married Bonnie Bennett.  They made a trip to New York and tried to trace her Bennett ancestors, but it was hopeless.

 

We have no idea what part of Indiana Great Grandpa Smith (Eli) was born in.

 

Grandma Gertie’s great grandfather, Jackson, was born in England. Her great grandmother Jackson traced her ancestors to the Dutch settling of New York.

 

Lucia Jackson (daughter of his union) married Grandma Gertie’s grandfather, Emerick Bennett (Elmer Cortis was born to them).  Lucia’s twin sister, Lucretia, married Emerick’s brother, Jack.

 

Eva’s middle name was Emerald.

 

Grandma never heard the mention of a name for her stillborn brother. On the tombstone it merely says Baby Bennett.  Grandma wonders if Aunt Winnie chose a name for convenience of the records.

 

Your grandfather Smith, Aaron Victor, was born in Marshall County, Kansas, on Nov. 21, 1876.

 

(The  remainder of Addie’s letter is in the “Smith” family history.)

I hope this clears up some questions for you.  Feel free to ask all the questions you like and we’ll do our best with them. We love hearing from you.  Enjoyed so much the Christmas letter, as always, and the enclosed pictures are so precious.

 

No word from your Mom since we saw them.  We trust that they are both well.

 

God bless you all and direct your steps in all things.

 

Now if any of this is unclear or brings to mind more questions, just let me know and I promise to get them answered will within the next four years.

 

Love you all,

 

Addie

 

——————————–

 

Bennett Odds and Ends collected over the years by Larry Smith

 

From Winann Patterson, White City, Oregon December 25, 1977

 

The story of the Bennett drinking glasses given to Larry and Lloyd by Winann. Larry’s hangs on their kitchen wall. Whenever the kids would get into a tussle I would holler, “Watch out for my 100 year-old glass!” And then run over to protect it.

 

“A set of 12 was given to Grandmother Smith’s parents (Elmer C. Bennett) on their wedding day.  Six remained in the home following Great Grandmother’s death.  As Aunt Winnie (Winann’s grandmother) entered a difficult time of readjustment following her mother’s death and her father’s remarriage, her father (Elmer C) gave them to her as a token of love.

 

Four remained when they were given to Winann by her grandmother.  One was give to us last year.  The Patterson still have two and one was given to Lloyd.

___________________

 

Notes from Grandma G. Smith while visiting with her in San Jose, California, March 20, 1977

 

Garrett Bennett was killed in a hunting accident in New York. Was found dead in the woods.

 

Grandmother’s father’s sister was Orpha Durlusky (“Lesky”)  Orpha worked in a woolen mill in Vermont before her marriage.

 

Elias Smith was a United Brethren minister. Great grandmother Ida Smith died of diabetes in Kalispell in September 1919.

 

Uncle Chet Bennett married Bonnie Bennett. She did not have to change names. They once traveled back to New York to trace her family. Did not find any connection between the two Bennett family lines.

 

This part is from Winann Paterson, February 22, 1977.  About Aunt Bonnie Bennett.  Winann and Bonnie have kept in touch over the years. She saw her last in Tacoma. She was going blind with glaucoma.  Doesn’t know if she is still alive.  Have not heard from her for four or five years.  Used to always send Christmas cards.  Had a sister, but don’t know her name.  Winann suggested that we try to find a death certificate.  Winann has lost her address book with Bonnie’s address.  She may be dead by now. Bonnie became a Jehovah’s Witness soon after her husband, Chester, was killed by the Japanese.  The family didn’t have much to do with her after her conversion.  She tried to convert the rest of the family.  Aunt Winnie and Aunt Bonnie, sister-in-laws- were quite close.

 

Twin sisters Lucia and Lucretia married brothers.

 

Elmer C. Bennett’s Grandfather Bennett was from England.

 

Grandma’s Jackson Family branch traces back to the Dutch settling New York (or New Amsterdam).

 

Emerick Bennett served in the Civil War from 1962 – 1865.  His trigger finger was shot off.

 

Garrett – Garret – Bennett was at one time from Peru, New   York

Found listed in the PeruVillageCemetery

(Do not know if there is a family connection to these Bennetts.)

Alva Bennett / died June 29, 1877 at the age of 72

Jemima Soper / his wife Died December 31, 1892, age 92

 

Found listed in the IrishSettlementCemetery – Schnyler Falls (not sure of town’s name)

Patrick Bennett / died March 17, 1859, age 70 years

Cathernie Bennett / died February 2, 1869, age 74 years.

—————————————————-

 

Emerick Bennett Military Record  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 22, 2004

Categories: Emerick Bennett Family, War Records

 

 

ENLISTED

Bennett, Emerick

 

Age; 23 yrs. 25 days

 

Month; August year; 1862

 

Where; Malone, [Resident of] Burke

 

Period [of enlistment] Years ; 3

 

MI (Mustered in] 29, September 1862

 

Grade [illegible]

 

Company; H

 

Reg’t; 142nd Infantry   *

 

LEFT THE ORGANIZATION

MO[Mustered Out] 6, June, 1865

Grade; Corporal

 

Explanation; With detachment at Newberne , NC

REMARKS:

 

Absent. Wounded in action July 3, 1864 and sent to Hospital [Fort Monro, VA was written and then crossed out and replaced with] Newark, NY.

 

M.R. [probably Military Reassignment] Det. 64.

 

Promoted Corporal Feb. 10, 1863, Wounded in action May 16, 1864 at Drurys Bluff VA.

 

Absent. at Hospital, RaleighN.C. May 15, 1865

 

Born; Peru NY Age; 23 years. Occupation; Farmer

 

Eyes; Grey Hair; Brown Complexion; light 5ft 10 1/2 inches high.

 

=======================================

 

On 1/27/04 6:13 AM, Stan Maine at smaine@northnet.org wrote:

 

Hi Larry,

 

My name is Stan Maine and I answer the Civil War queries for the St. Lawrence County Historical Association, SLCHA.  I found Emerick Bennett in the NY Adjutant-General’s report for the 142nd Infantry. He enlisted age 23 years, August 25, 1862 at Burke (FranklinCounty) NY.  to serve three years.  Mustered in as a private, Co. H Sept 29th, 1862, promoted Corporal Feb 10, 1863, wounded in action, May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, VA. and July 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment, June 6, 1865 at New Berne NC. Knowing that Burke is in FranklinCounty I went to the Civil war part of the RootswebFranklinCounty site and found Emerick on this page:

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyfrank/civilwar/cw_burke.htm

 

I also found him on the 1890 Veterans’ census for Burke on the same Rootsweb site. That census noted that he lost a finger on his right hand.  These are the three sources that are best for individuals in the Civil War. John Austin’s information comes from the Civil War Town Clerk’s Records. The best place for information on individual soldiers is the Records at the National Archives.  Since he had an injury he most likely had a pension so, if you haven’t yet, it would be useful to send for his records, both military and pension.

 

If you need help getting started on that part please ask.

 

As far as the 142nd Infantry goes I have a lot of information but I would like to have you answer this message first before I go into this regiment.  Sometimes I answer these queries and never find out if the person even gets the message. No answer at all!  If you have specific questions it would help me in formulating my information on the 142nd.

 

Hope this helps and look forward to hearing from you.

 

Stan Maine

smaine@northnet.org

============

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Dec 28, 2002  

Categories: Emerick Bennett Family

 

 

 

-TOWN CLERK RECORDS, FRANKLIN CO., NY- THE MILITARY LIST

 

The military list was compiled from several sources, but the principal source was the Town Clerk records of 1865. New YorkState required all Town Clerks in the state to compile a list of men from their respective towns who had comprised the quota of men furnished to the service of the US. Although there are 19 towns in modern day Franklin Co., there were only 16 towns in 1860 and of those, town clerk records survive for only 12. The other four towns either never compiled the list (the state provided no funding other than mailing costs) or the records were made and subsequently lost through fire or whatever. When properly filled out, these town clerk records provide a wealth of information about the men from a certain town: birth date, birthplace, mother’s maiden name and other bits of information make some of these records a goldmine for historians and genealogists. Unfortunately, not all the Town Clerks were as diligent as they should have been, and the records from some towns are not very useful. A summary of the Franklin Co. Town Clerk records follows: Altamont- was still a part of Dickinson during the Civil War and so has no separate records of its own Bangor- no Town Clerks records exist, but they apparently did in 1880, as Duane Hurd used them in his “History of Franklin and ClintonCounties”. Belmont- records exist with about 205 men listed. However, there are two different versions of the list and they differ significantly in some of their details. Bombay- no Town Clerk’s records exist, and nothing was listed in Hurd’s book. The information listed here was taken from the 1865 military list, the 1890 veterans’ census and other records. Brandon- records exist with about 63 men listed, but the originals are very difficult to read. Brighton – records exist, but they are different from the ones Hurd lists. Burke – town records do exist, although Hurd claimed he could not get access to them. Therefore, he used a list of men who were in the service in 1864 which is somewhat different from the Town records. The microfilm copies are almost illegible

 

-INDEX TO TOWN CLERKS’ CIVIL WAR RECORDS, FRANKLIN CO., NY. -

 

NAME                     UNIT           TOWN LIST

 

Bennett, Andrew 16th NY Co. I CHATEAUGAY

Bennett, Edmond L. 98th NY Co. A COMBINED SOURCES

 

Bennett, Emrick 142nd NY Co. H BURKE

 

Bennett, George W. 16th Cav. Co. E BURKE

Bennett, Zebulon 16th NY Co. I CHATEAUGAY

-1883 PENSIONERS, NY -

NAME               PO ADDRESS         REASON FOR PENSION       AMOUNT     DATE OF ALLOWANCE      REMARKS

 

Bennett, Emrick  Burke Center  loss of right index finger  $ 2.67  Jul. 1867

Enlisted in the 142nd NY Co. H and was wounded in 1864.                

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 22, 2004

==================

 

142d NYSV

 

* Nickname – St. Lawrence County Regiment

* Recruitment area:

* Company A – Macomb, DeKalb, Oswegatchie, Gouverneur, Hermon, Canton, Colton and Fine

* Company B – Rossie, Gouverneur, Morristown, Hammond, Macomb and Fowler

* Company C – Waddington, Ogdensburg, Lisbon, Louisville and Madrid

* Company D – Macomb, Bangor, Franklin, Westville, Constable, Burke and Belmont

* Company E – Oswegatchie, DePeyster, Lisbon and Hammond

* Company F – Dickinson, Bangor, Moira, Brandon and Lawrence

* Company G – Oswegatchie, FortCovington, Bombay, Canton, Lisbon and Westville

 

** Company H – Macomb, Burke, Bellmont, Constable and Brandon

 

* Company I – Massena, Waddington, Potsdam, Pierrepont, Hammond, Madrid, Louisville

* Company K – Russell, Canton, Pierrepont, Ogdensburg and Lisbon

 

* Dates of Service:

* Mustered in – Sept. 29, 1862 at Ogdensburg

* Mustered out – June 7, 1865 at Raleigh, NC

* Colonels:

* Roscius W. JUDSON

* Newton Martin CURTIS

* Albert M. BARNEY

 

 

 

* Casualty Totals: Battle Related

 

Killed

Officers 2

Enlisted 68

Wounded – died

Officers 2

Enlisted 59

Wounded – recovered

Officers 20

Enlisted 320

Missing

Officers 0

Enlisted 23

TOTAL 494

Died of Disease & other causes

Officers 2

Enlisted 146

As POWs

Officers 0

Enlisted 14

TOTAL 162

TOTAL CASUALTIES – 656

————————————————————————

Maintained by Sue Greenhagen.

E-mail: greenhsh@morrisville.edu

Last updated 8 March 2001 Last Modified on Mon Jan 7 08:02:10 2002

=============================

 

UNION NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS

142nd Regiment, New York Infantry                “St. Lawrence County Regiment”

 

Organized at Ogdensburg, N. Y., and mustered in September 29, 1862. LeftState for Washington, D. C., October 6, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie’s Division, Defences of Washington, D. C., to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to May 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to July 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August 1863. 1st Brigade, Gordon’s Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, Gordon’s Division, Northern District, Dept. of the South, to April 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to May, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, to June 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, to December 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 24th Army Corps, to January 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Terry’s Provisional Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1865.

 

SERVICE. -Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till April 1862. Moved to Suffolk, Va., April 19. Siege of Suffolk, Va., April 20-May 4. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Expedition to Kings and Queens County May 15 (1 Co.). Dix’s Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Ordered to Washington, D. C., July 10. Pursuit of Lee to Berlin, Md., July 13-22. Moved to Folly Island, S. C., August 1-8. Siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg, Morris Island, S. C., and against Fort Sumpter and Charleston, S. C., August 9-September 7. Operations against Charleston and duty at Folly Island, Johns Island and Hilton Head, S. C., till April, 1864. Expedition to Johns and James Islands February 6-14, 1864. Skirmishes at Bugbee’s Bridge February 9 and 11. Ordered to Yorktown, Va., April 1864. Butler’s Campaign on south side of the James and operations against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of City Point and Bermuda Hundred May 5. Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury’s Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, thence to Cold Harbor May 28-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to December 7, 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30. Duty in trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda Hundred front till September 27. Battle of Chaffin’s Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in trenches before Richmond till December. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear Intrenchments February 11-13. Wilmington February 18-19. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett’s House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh till June. Mustered out June 7, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 169th New York Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 126 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 161 Enlisted men by disease. Total 292.

——————————–

Proctor’s Creek   

 

Other Names: Drewry’s Bluff, Drury’s Bluff, FortDarling

 

This is the battle in which Emerick Bennett lost his right index finger,

May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, VA

 

“Wounded in action, May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, VA. and July 3, 1864”

 

Location:ChesterfieldCounty

 

Campaign:Bermuda Hundred Campaign (May-June 1864)

 

Date(s): May 12-16, 1864

 

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler [US]; Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard [CS]

 

Forces Engaged: 48,000 total (US 30,000; CS 18,000)

 

Estimated Casualties: 6,660 total

 

Description: After his repulse at Swift Creek and Fort Clifton on May 9, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler withdrew into his entrenchments at Bermuda Hundred. A Confederate army of 18,000 was patched together under command of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard to confront Butler’s 30,000. On May 12, Butler moved north against the Confederate line at Drewry’s Bluff but again adopted a defensive posture when his attack was not supported by gunboats. On the 13th a Union column struck the right flank of the Confederate line at the Wooldridge House, carrying a line of works. Butler remained cautious, however, giving Beauregard time to concentrate his forces. On May 16 at dawn, Ransom’s Confederate division opened an attack on Butler’s right flank, routing many units. Subsequent attacks lost direction in the fog, but the Federals were disorganized and demoralized. After severe fighting, Butler extricated himself from battle, withdrawing again to his Bermuda Hundred Line. This battle stopped Butler’s offensive against Richmond.

 

Result(s): Confederate victory

 

CWSAC Reference #: VA053

Preservation Priority: IV.1 (Class B)

National Park Unit: Richmond NB

 

——————————————-

 

Fair Oaks & Darbytown Road  

 

Emerick Bennett may not have fought in this battle, because being wounded in action, May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, VA. and July 3, 1864

 

 

 

Other Names: Second Fair Oaks

 

Location: HenricoCounty

 

Campaign: Richmond-Petersburg Campaign (June 1864-March 1865)

 

Date(s): October 27-28, 1864

 

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler [US]; Lt. Gen. James Longstreet [CS]

 

Forces Engaged: Corps

 

Estimated Casualties: 1,750 total

 

Description: In combination with movements against the Boydton Plank Road at Petersburg, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler attacked the Richmond defenses along Darbytown Road with the X Corps. The XVIII Corps marched north to Fair Oaks where it was soundly repulsed by Field’s Confederate division. Confederate forces counterattacked, taking some 600 prisoners. The Richmond defenses remained intact. Of Grant’s offensives north of the James River, this was repulsed most easily.

 

Result(s): Confederate victory

CWSAC Reference #: VA080

Preservation Priority: N/D (Class C)

————————————————————————

 

Ralph Bennett – Dec 31, 2002

Cortes, Emrick, and Silas Bennett are sons of Garret Bennett and Orpha (JEFFERS) Bennett

 

Cortes Bennett — Civil War Record  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 2, 2002

Categories: Emerick Bennett Family

 

Cortes Bennett    

 

Service Record:

 

Enlisted as a Private on 27 December 1861 in Malone, NY at the age of 18

Enlisted in Company A, 98th Infantry Regiment New   York on 27 December 1861

Died on 05 November 1862 in Cumberland, MD

 

Sources:

New York: Report of the Adjutant-General. (NYRoster) Published in 1894-1906

NOTE: This was the youngest brother of Emerick Bennett.   He was killed in the Civil War at age 19.  Grandma Smith’s father, Elmer Cortis Bennett may have been named after his deceased Uncle.     

 

 

Garrett Bennett Family 

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Dec 14, 2000

Family Group Sheet

Name:Garrett Bennett

—————————————-

Birth: 1801 Schroon, NY

Spouse: Orpha Jeffers

—————————————-

Birth: 1803 Saratago, NY

Children:

—————————————-

 

1 M: Jefferson D. Bennett

Birth: 1827 NY

Death: 7 Nov 1907 Burke, New YorkFranklin County

—————————————-

2 M: Justus Bennett

Birth: 3 Jan 1829

Death: 20 Jan 1893 At 64 Yrs. 17 Days

Spouse: Lucretine ( Lucretia?) Jackson

—————————————-

3 F: Orpha Bennett

Birth: 1 Aug 1832

Spouse: Daniel Thomas

—————————————-

4 M: Hailman Bennett

Birth: 1834

Spouse: Lucy A Gilman

—————————————-

5 M: Emerick Bennett

Birth: 1 Mar 1835 Peru, NY ClintonCounty

Death: 30 Jan 1930 at 92-Year-Old Burke, NY

Spouse: Lucia Jackson

Marriage: 1857

—————————————-

6 F: Celia Bennett

Birth: 1842

—————————————-

7 M: Silas Bennett

Birth: 1844

—————————————-

8 M: Curtire Bennett

Birth: 1845

 

 

Notes for Garrett Bennett

 

1840 Census of PeruClintonCounty

Garrett Bennett

2 under five males

2 5 under 10 males

2 10 and under 15   males

1 40 and under 50 males

1 under 5 female

1 5 and under 10 female

2 15 and under 20 females

1 30 under 40 females

August 1850 Census of ClintonCountyPeru NY

Garrett   Bennett   49 male

Orpha Bennett     47   Female

Jefferson Bennett 23 male

Justus Bennett   21 male

Orpha Bennett 18 Female Crossed out male Written

Mialmat Bennett 16 Female

Emerick Bennett 12 Male

Celia Bennett 8 Female

Silas Bennett 6 Male

Cartire Bennett 5 Male

Aug 1860 Peru NY ClintonCounty

Jefferson Bennett 32 male Farmer NY

Celia Bennett   19   Housekeeper

Emerick Bennett 22 male

Leucia Bennett 24 female

Cartes Bennett 6/12

Silas Bennett   18 Male

Cartes Bennett 16 male

—————————————-

Last Modified: 7 Apr 1999                   Created: 15 Nov 2000

 

Ralph Bennett – Dec 20, 2000  

 

Do you know a Larry BENNETT Smith from Jacksonville, OR.   I corresponded with him in 1979. Do you have a source for the birthplace of Garret Bennett as being born in SchroonLake, EssexCounty and Warren County, NY?

I have additional information if message reaches you

ralph bennett                     

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Jan 19, 2002

Larry Bennett Smith, son of Elmer Bennett Smith, is my cousin.   He is working on a biography of his father.   I am hoping to see Larry on this site and/or be able to share his Dad’s history.

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Dec 4, 2000

Attached To: Elmer Bennett Family Travels

File – Elmer Cortis Bennett.doc -

 

============================

Grandma Smith- Reminisces

 

Taped: December 12, 1974

 

Oral History of Elmer Cortis Bennett

 

As told by his daughter, Gertrude May (Bennett) Smith

 

Typed by Larry Bennett Smith from the original tape.  () denotes questions by Addie Wold.

 

This is December 12, 1974.   The place is the Wold kitchen in Los   Angeles, California.   We want to ask Grandma Smith some questions about people in the family and what happened years ago.

 

(Where were your parents born, Mom?)

 

In New YorkState, in the northern part, close to the Canadian line.

 

(Near the city of Ogdensburg?)

 

Well, Malone was the closest city and that was closer to the Canadian line than Ogdensburg.

 

(This past fall when we took our trip back eat we saw from across the St.

Lawrence the outline of the town of Ogdensburg and we thought about the Bennett family then.)

 

Ogdensburg was south of them and that’s where the railroad crossed the St. Lawrence River.

 

(Grandpa Bennett was born in 1860.   Was Grandma Bennett born in there?)

 

Yes, she was born there in New York.   Her parents lived there.   They both went to the same school.   There was so much difference in their age.   Father didn’t pay any attention to it.

 

(What year was she born?)

 

She was 6 years younger than father.

 

(That would make it 1866, if he was born in 1860 and her name was Call, Ida Cora Call and Grandpa’s name was Elmer Cortis and Grandpa’s family…)

 

Grandfather Bennett settled on a homestead there in that part of New   York and father helped clear the forest, hardwood timber.   Father helped plant an apple orchard on Grandfather’s place and had to take over a great deal of the work when Grandfather went into the Army, the Northern Army, in the Civil War. He was in for three years.   Then he had to be discharged because his trigger finger was shot off.   He went in the army when Father was 5 months old.   His health never was good after that.

 

He enlisted in the 142nd NY Co. He and was wounded in 1864.

Father stayed at home until he was 22.   He had 2 brothers, two younger brothers and 2 sisters.   The younger brother took over the farm after Father left and Father went to Minnesota and took a homestead there.

 

Burke, N.Y., March 29, 1882

 

Elmer Bennett left for Minnesota Monday of this week.

 

Source:  Franklin Gazette

             Wead Library

             Malone, Franklin County, New York

 

(Near Minneapolis, wasn’t it?)

 

No, it was across the state from Minneapolis, 18 miles from the Dakota Line.

 

(That’s right, Norman County, town of Ada)

 

We were 18 miles from the Dakota line and mother’s family moved to Minnesota about a year of so after Father came out.

 

(He had come out all by himself hadn’t he?)

 

Yes, he had an aunt, a married aunt; his mother’s sister and an uncle out there.   And his uncle had married his mother’s sister.   They came out on account of their daughter. Father’s place was next to theirs.

 

[Census Records show Justus Bennett, Uncle of Elmer Cortis Bennett was married to Lucretia Jackson, sister of Elmer's Mother, Luci Jackson.   Married 1857.]

 

Mother had grown quit a bit since he had seen her and they were married about two years after they came out there.

 

(What year did he come out to Minnesota?   Do you remember?)

 

Not exactly, I don’t remember. I think he was 22.

 

(That would make it 1882) (The record shows that this date is correct.)

 

They were married 2 years before I was born and that would make it 1883. They were married a year and a half after he came out.

 

Note: from Norman County Marriage Records;  

Husband                 Wife       Marriage Date Book Page

Bennett, Elmer Call, Ida C. Jan 20 1884           1     140  

 

(You were born two years after they were married?)

 

Yes, I was the baby for seven years.

 

(Then Uncle Chester was born.)

 

Yes

 

(He was born the same month you were?)

 

Before my seventh birthday, and then, my sister was born, 2 years later.

 

(2 1⁄2 years. July… 3 years later, because she was… almost 3 years after Chester.   It would make it 1885, 1887, 1890 when Aunt Winnie was born?)

 

No, 7 plus 5, Chester born ’92 and Winnie ’94

(You were born in 1885?)

 

Winnie was born in 1894, she lacked from July to November from being 3 years older. Father had a rough time on that farm because the elements were against him.   The river overflowed in the spring some years and it would make it late getting the crops in.   One year the river overflowed in the middle of July.   It washed in the fields for 2 weeks and many of the crops weren’t harvested because they couldn’t get into the fields in time and he lost that year’s crops.   Many of the farmers around there did.

 

The last year he was there in 1898, mother died and father was so far in debt that… in debt through the year you know…   lose a crop and he just couldn’t catch up.   He was so far behind then that he sold the place and I think he wanted to get away anyway.   He didn’t have Mother.

 

Note:   Land Records for Minnesota show:

Name: ELMER Bennett

Date:   06 Nov 1889

Location: MN

Document # 4672

Serial # MN04080_. 478

Sale Type: HOMESTEAD

Acres: 160.0000

Meridian or Watershed: 5th

Parcel:   Township 144N, Range 46W, Section 32

 

(The winters were quite severe, weren’t they?)

 

Yes, very severe.   There hardly was a winter, but what it didn’t get down to 40 degrees below.   We had blizzards that would last 2 or 3 days.   It was …  you just didn’t go anywhere.   I remember one blizzard we had in March.   Father couldn’t get to the barn for two days.   Maybe I’m mistaken; he might have gotten to the barn sooner than that.   Mother and I were away from home when the storm came up.   We were at the neighbors and he didn’t come after us for 3 days.   And…. but there was at least one day he couldn’t get to the barn.

 

(Grandma once mentioned how the farmers would string wire from the house to the barn so they could find the door to the house or the barn during a blizzard by following the wire. Many a farmer was lost when they could not find the house and wandered off in the wrong direction.)

 

 

 

(How large was his homestead?)

 

160 acres, a quarter section, that is what they gave him.

 

[Note:   Land Records for Minnesota show the Homestead listed as:]

Name:   ELMER Bennett

Date:   23 Jan 1885

Acres:   160.0000

Location: MN,

Serial # MN0340_. 333

Sale type:   CASH ENTRY SALE

Acres; 160.0000

Meridian or Watershed: 5th

Parcel:   Township 144N, Range 46W, Section 12

 

(How much livestock did he have?)

 

Well, he usually had 2 or 3 cows, usually 2 cows and young stock.   He’d have some young stock coming up.   He didn’t keep much stock because he didn’t have any grassland.   What hay he had, he had to go several miles. He started out to raise cattle.   He had quite a herd started, then they settled around him so he couldn’t get hay and he sold the cattle.

 

(And how many horses did he have?)

 

Well, he had two until he got more acreage under cultivation, then he had three.   He had hard luck with his horses too.   One nice one that he had laid down and died when she was having her colt.   And Father had a lot of hard luck that way, but I never heard him complain.

 

(Dad tells the story of the time the hay loft above the barn collapsed – crushing two horses to death.)

 

(And he sang through it all. Then the fourth child was stillborn in November of 1898)

 

Another little boy.   It was never named and then 9 days after he was born mother died. [Note: The boy was buried in the mother’s arms.]

 

Deceased Name           DOD YOD Ind Book Page Line Note

Bennett, __________ Nov 13 1898   1       1       68   133   Stillborn

Bennett, Ida C.             Nov 23 1898   1       1       68     132

 

(In 1952 when we went back to Minnesota and visited Ada and we said something to the motel manager about my grandfather having lived near Ada, but did not know where, he said, “Oh, I know where the Bennett farm is.”  So after all these years the farm is still known as the Bennett place.   The reason is, the places are named for whoever homesteaded them. It’s why it’s called the Bennett place.   We didn’t go out to the Bennett Place because we were pressed for time.   But we did go to the Cemetery and as I walked around the little town of Ada and looked at the different buildings I found myself wondering, did Mom ever stand in this particular spot?

 

And I’m sure I walked on sidewalks that she walked on and when I came to the Cemetery, I knew the, beyond a shadow of a doubt that I was walking on ground that Mom had walked on years ago and we looked around the headstones trying to find the Bennett grave and didn’t find it.   We finally met one of the caretakers and asked him and he said, “Oh, yes, it’s over there.”   And he pointed it out to us.   It was a tall beautiful marker and we had been looking at the little tiny markers and we hadn’t found it.   He told us something very interesting. Just that spring, which was 1952, he had cut down a white lilac bush that had been on the grave all those years.   Grandpa had planted it before he left Ada.   He had planted it on Grandma’s grave and it had grown all those years and bloomed faithfully every spring.   But the caretaker said it had gotten pretty scraggly, so he had cut it down just that spring.   He said he often thought about that grave.   No one ever came and he was curious about it.   He was pleased to meet us and talk to us about it.) (This would be Addie and Quentin Wold)

 

I well remember being there in 1898.   Bitterly cold.   The ground was frozen and how there was no snow.   The funeral procession…. The funeral was held at the house.   The funeral procession moved slowly over what was “rocky” road because it was frozen.

 

(Just a few days after your 13th birthday.)

 

My birthday was the 8th of November and Mother was buried the 23rd. No, she died the 23rd.   I remember the date of her death because the 24th was Thanksgiving.   She died the night before Thanksgiving.

 

(Her death was quite sudden and unexpected wasn’t it?)

 

Yes, it was a heart attack and she ate dinner with us that night, that evening. She died about 2 hours later.

 

(You had no knowledge of her having a heart condition did you?)

 

No, Father had, she had had a little trouble with it some years before, but there hadn’t been any lately.

 

(And that left you in charge of a brother and a sister.)

 

After the funeral, Father’s aunt who lived about 8 miles from us came and helped father get things straightened out, and Mother’s things were taken care of.   Well, I heard them talking about getting some woman to come and stay with us.   And I told Aunt Addie that I didn’t want someone to come, I wanted to cook.   I knew how Mama used to do it.   But I found out the hard way that knowing how she did it and doing it was two different things.   But father, bless his heart never complained.

 

There was one thing that I haven’t mentioned, that Father and Mother had Sunday school in the schoolhouse every summer.   They were the only …  I remember one young woman that used to come to Sunday school.   They were the only adults except for this young woman.   We were 5 miles from any church.   And they thought that was a long ways.   Father started out with oxen.   Drove oxen for four or five years before he got horses.   And in the wintertime the roads were so bad and the storms were liable to be bad.   Farmers don’t pay any attention to Sundays.   In the summertime Father would be using the horses in the field all week.   He didn’t like to put them on the road on Sunday to go that far. And they would have Sunday school.   Father was Superintendent.   Both of them would teach classes.   Father and Mother furnished the singing.   I’ve known many of the old hymns that I learned then.

 

And after Father sold the place there and went to Canada in 1900.  It was the same situation.

We were a long ways from Sunday school.   We were 3 miles from the schoolhouse and we would go to Sunday school, but only once in a great while would there be a preaching service. But I never lost my faith.   It was a part of my being because mother always had family worship.   And it was just a part of me as my ABC’s.

 

And I remember when Father was dying in 1912, he was in Colorado and I was in Idaho.   My stepmother wrote that while he was lying there with cancer eating his life out he sang “Abide With Me”.

He was single for 6 years after Mother died.   The he….

 

(In 1900, 2 years after she died he went to Canada?)

 

Yes, a year and a half.   She died in November and he went in the spring and I lived in Canada.   I was married in Canada.   And lived there for seven years.

 

(Let’s backtrack for just a minute.   He homesteaded in Canada also didn’t he?)

 

Yes, in Ponoka.

 

(In the province of Alberta and south of Edmonton.   6 miles south of Edmonton and how big was his homestead there?)

 

A quarter section.   160 acres,

 

(And that was 1900.   Then in 1904 you had neighbors move in.)

 

And that was another story.

 

(And it was Grandma [my] Smith’s sister who married my Grandpa Bennett.)

 

She (Dora DeLair Patterson, with her four girls had fled an unhappy marriage)  had lived in Colorado and she went to Idaho to visit her sister and they went to Canada and she went to Canada on the spur of the moment.

 

(Did she live with them there in Canada?)

 

Well, while she was …

 

(Until she married.)

 

She went up there in July and Father and Aunt Dora were married in October, the next October.          (Dora was both Gertie’s aunt by marriage after marring Aaron Victor and her stepmother.)

 

(Then how long did Grandpa Bennett stay in Canada?)

 

He was there 9 years.   No, I’ll correct that, I was there 7 years and I left in the fall and he left the next spring, 7 1⁄2 years.   And he moved to Colorado.   And he and my stepmother started a restaurant down there.   I don’t know whether Father built it or…He did a lot of carpentry work.   But I don’t know if he built it or bought the restaurant.   They went to New Mexico across the line.

 

(Do you remember the name of the town?)

 

Farmington and in 1911 Father got sick. I don’t remember just what time of the year when it started, but I remember at Christmas time my stepmother wrote that he…they got him out of bed into a chair and pulled the chair over to the table for Christmas dinner.   He couldn’t eat.   So he was helpless then and he lived until the 22nd of April.

 

(1912?)

 

Yes.   Before he died, my stepmother wouldn’t give up that he was going to die.   She would not let anybody mention such a thing to him.   And she…

 

She decided to take him to Washington to where one of her married daughters was.  She got him into the baggage car on a cot and she sat with him in the baggage car.  And they went to Ellensburg, Washington.  And two or three days after they got there he died.  He’s buried there.  I was in Idaho.  Grampa Smith (Elias) offered to buy me a ticket to go to the funeral.  I told him it wouldn’t do any good.  It wouldn’t help Father and it wouldn’t help me.

 

(I can very vaguely remember the day that you received the news. There is just little fleeting glimpses of memory now that brings that day back to me the day you received the word that he was dead.) (Addie was 5.)

 

Father was so sick and I had gotten a letter from the folks down there. Ila would see me crying. Come to me and say, “I love you Mother.”  She was only little then.

 

 

 

(How large a man was Grandpa Bennett?)

 

He was 5’’10” and he weighed 180 pounds for years.   He said that when he was young he tried to get over 200, but he never could quite make it.

 

(Well he never stood still long enough to put on any extra.   And Grandma, was she a small woman?)

 

She was about my size.

 

(Which would make her around 5’1”?)

 

5’2” what I used to be.

 

(And I suppose 120 pounds.)

 

Something like that.  She was getting heavier.   She was 32 when she died.   Her clothes were getting tight for her.

 

(Grandpa Bennett was born January the 20th, 1860.)

 

Grandma Bennett’s birthday was June 18, 1866.

Father Bennett, my father, used to haul his wheat to a town, “Twinbennett”, he called it, had his wheat ground for their winter’s flower, in Minnesota.   Quentin’s [Wold, husband of Addie] father used to pass that mill going to school.   But we didn’t know anything about it until Addie came to California.

 

(In fact Quentin’s Grandmother and my Grandmother are buried just 10 miles apart…. Dad Wold’s mother.  A bit ago we mentioned what stern stuff Grandpa Bennett was made of.   So let’s talk about some of the things he had to contend with through his life.   Problems and difficulties and fight the elements and the things that happened to him on his first homestead in Minnesota where the elements were against him and wiped out his crops.   He had gone in 1899 to Canada by himself to lay claim to a homestead. Is that right?)

 

Yes.

 

(And came back to harvest his crops that fall.   Tell what happened to the crop.)

 

He was putting up hay several miles from home.   He had to do it because there was no hay around close.   And he was going to start his harvest the next day.   While he was

gone that day the storm came up.   A terrific hailstorm and it cleaned out the whole crop and several around.   We didn’t get anything out of that crop at all.   And after we went to Cannonade…. (Not sure what this is in reference to?)

 

(That left him in such financial straights that he couldn’t even move to Canada when he intended to.)

 

He had to wait until he sold the place.   He had to get an extension on his time to move onto the place in Canada. Then he sold the place the next spring.   He put in a crop before he left, so it would sell better.   And he left there the 5th of June.

 

(And when he got to Canada…)

 

In Canada, in the winter 1904 and 1905, he cut timber on my stepmother’s homestead.   It was 12 miles from his.   He needed the timber to build buildings on her place.   He had a sawmill moved in to get the lumber ready. In the summer of 1905, after your father and I were married, he built the house, a good substantial house.   He had the windows all in and the doors and everything finished.   And went home to get ready to move and the fire struck there.   All that was left was a pile of slabs.   So, he took the slabs and made a house and barn.   And they moved up there.   And they lived there 3 years and my stepmother moved up on the place.   After he had spent the whole winter getting the timber ready, I’d see him drive home with his pants legs frozen stiff.   He had wallowed around in the snow getting that timber out. .

 

(And to have a fire sweep through and destroy it all.)

 

Not long after they moved up there, Father started a Sunday school in the schoolhouse.   He had to do it alone because my stepmother didn’t take any part.

 

(But he never complained about his lot in life?)

 

No, not in all of his troubles, I never heard him complain or wonder why.   He kept his faith through it all. Not long ago I heard a minister, Jerry Falwell, say you can’t judge a man by what he owned or what he had done but by what it took to break him.        I thought of Father.

 

 

ELMER C. BENNETT DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Came Here From New Mexico Last Week in Effort to Benefit Health.

 

Elmer C. Bennett, aged 52 years, died last night at “The Pines,” on North Pine Street, after an illness of more than a year, of a complication of diseases. Mr. Bennett, accompanied by his wife and Mrs. A. Honeyman of Farmington, New Mexico, for the benefit of Mr. Bennett’s health. Although he has been ill for 15 months he has only been confined to his bed for a short time. Mr. Bennett was born in Burke, N.Y., where he lived for 22 years, having later made his home in Minnesota, Canada, Colorado and New Mexico. Besides his wife he is survived by five children, Mrs. Bert Gartin and Chester Bennett of this city, Mrs. A. V. Smith of Kendrick, Idaho, Winnie Bennett of Durango, Colorado, and Mrs. Geo. Honeyman of Farmington, New   Mexico. The funeral will be held on Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the Rose and Inman chapel. Services will be conducted by the Rev. John W. Caughlan of the MethodistChurch.

————————————————————————

 

Alberta Homesteads  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Jun 29, 2003

Categories: Eli Smith Descendants, Elmer Bennett Family, Land Records

This specialty database relates exclusively to Letters Patent issued by the Lands Patent Branch of the Department of the Interior. The records refer to grants issued in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the railway belt of British Columbia, c. 1870-1930. PonokaCounty 42-44-22-5-w4&w5 Ponoka County Legal Land Description 1 PT SE 30 43 25 W4 Part Section Township Range Meridian Reference      Liber: 193 Folio: 132 File reel number: C-6085 Names: Elmer Cortis Bennett

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Jul 1, 2003

3 SW 7 13 10 W4 PartSectionTownshipRangeMeridian

Reference:

Liber: 609

Folio: 355

File reel number: C-6420

 

 

Names: Aaron Smith

1 SE 8 48 12 W3 PartSectionTownshipRangeMeridian

Reference:

Liber: 824

Folio: 395

File reel number: C-6597

Names: Elias Smith

————————————————————————

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 28, 2004

Ponoka County 42-44-22-5-w4&w5 PonokaCounty

269 SE 3 61 25 W4 PartSectionTownshipRangeMeridian

Reference:

Liber: 949

Folio: 470

File reel number: C-6706

Names: Elmer Bennett

270 PT SE 30 43 25 W4 PartSectionTownshipRangeMeridian

Reference:

Liber: 193

Folio: 132

File reel number: C-6085

Names: Elmer Cortis Bennett

LegalLand Description

1 PT     SE       30           43           25         W4

PartSectionTownshipRangeMeridian

Reference

Liber: 193

Folio: 132

File reel number: C-6085

Names: Elmer Cortis Bennett

————————————–

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Nov 6, 2002

 

Census Records for Bennett Family: 1901

Province/Territory:   The Territories

District Name: ALBERTA

District Number: 202  Sub-district Name: Ponoka Sub-district Number: q (3) Schedule:   1

Reference:      http://www.archives.ca/db/gad/inv/031i1e.htmRG31, Statistics Canada

Microfilm Reel Number: T-6551 Finding Aid Number: 31-40

 

BENNETT Elmer C   Male – White – Head -Widowed

Born: January 20, 1860

Age: 41

b. US

Religion: Methodist

Occupation: Farmer

Can Read-Write- Speak English

Mother Tongue – English

Infirmities: * None

 

BENNETT Gertrude M   Female – White – Daughter – Single

Born: November 8, 1885

Age: 15

b. US

Religion: Methodist

Can Read-Write- Speak English

Mother Tongue – English

Infirmities: * None

 

 

 

BENNETT Chester O   Male – White – Son – Single

Born: November 6, 1892

Age:   8

b. US

Religion: Methodist

Can Read-Write- Speak English

Mother Tongue – English

Infirmities: * None

 

BENNETT Winnie G   Female – White – Daughter – Single

Born: July 10, 1895

Age:   6

b. US

Religion: Methodist

Can Read-Write- Speak English

Mother Tongue – English

Infirmities: * None

* Infirmities

A.   Deaf and dumb

B.   Blind

C.   Unsound Mind

===========================================

 

Chester Oscar Bennett and his tragic story.

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 26, 2004

 

Categories: Elmer Bennett Family

 

Uncle Chester Bennett

 

Mar 26, 2004 9:15 AM

 

Uncle Chester was killed by the Japanese possibly during the Bataan Death March or soon after the infamous march in the Philippines, July, 1942, after having been captured along with General Wainwright on the fortified island of Corregidor out in ManilaBay. The Bataan Death March was a separate event from the surrender of Corregidor a month or so later. Family tradition has Uncle Chester dying in the Bataan Death March, yet the few surviving family records have him surrendering with General Wainwright on Corregidor. He most likely died in the Cabanatuan POW Camp after being transferred across ManilaBay to the BataanPeninsula from Corregidor.   Uncle Chet was 50 years old when he died at the hands of the Japanese.

 

Aunt Winifred Grace Bennett Frizell, sister of Chester and Gertrude Bennett (Smith) wrote:”…In 1943 we got word that my brother had died in a Japanese prison camp. He had spent most of his life in the army and was captured at the fall of Corregidor.”   If Uncle Chester had in fact been on Macarthur’s staff in Manila as thought, then he would have fled to Corregidor when the Japanese attacked Manila on December 8, 1941.   After the fall of Manila, Macarthur retreated to the rocky island fortress of Corregidor.   On May 6, Gen Jonathan Wainright was forced to surrender to the Japanese.   Most of Wainwright’s men were sent north of Manila to the Japanese-run prisons at Cabanatuan. After the war, many surviving soldiers from Bataan came to resent the men from Corregidor who they would learn, generally had better food, better living conditions and a far lower incidences of malaria than troops on Bataan. Everyone suffered mightily in the battle for the Philippines, but the Bataan guys got the worst treatment at the hands of the Japanese.

Written by Larry Bennett Smith                      

====================

 

 

Bennett Photos at: https://picasaweb.google.com/114431897981658921755/ChesterBonnieBennettSAlbum#

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/114431897981658921755/BennettPhotos

 

 

 

Captian O. C. Bennett – history  (1892 – 1942)

 

Chester Oscar Bennett, born – November 6, 1892, Ada, Minnesota, died  November 27, 1942. A war casualty in a POW camp in the Philippines, Burial date May 13, 1949. age 50 at  death.  Was listed in the Alberta, Canada census as a Methodist.

 

Married Bonnie Adelaide. Bennett, born. September 12, 1892, Vassar, Michigan, Date of death December 24, 1978, Burial date Dec. 26,1978. Age 86, ThornhillValley Mortuary

 

Chester and Bonnie were married, June 22, 1919 in Spokane, Washington. They had no children.

 

Chester enlisted in the U.S. Army at Ft. George Wright, Washington, February 24, 1917. Age 24 years.

 

Bonnie was the eldest child of Mary Jane and Elmer William and sister of Mother Charlotte Maria Bennett. Chester was the stepson of Dora Bennett (parents: Ida Cora Call and Elmer Cortis Bennett)  Chester had two sisters: Winnefred (Frizell) and Gertrude Bennett Smith. Aunt Bonnie and Chester met when he came to Spokane from Ellensburg for induction into the Army.

 

While Chester was in France Aunt bonnie became seriously ill and underwent a hysterectomy.  When Uncle Chester returned from France he was assigned to the Army Recruiting Office, Spokane, they were married June 21, 1919.

 

Was assigned to the 3 CoC A C Puget Sound, Ft. Worden, Washington to May 20, 1918. Battery B 69 Artillery C A C February 27, 1919; 7 Company C A C Puget Sound, Ft. Worden, Washington to Discharge.

 

Fe

Served overseas: August 15, 1918 to February 18, 1919.  Then apparently he is reduced to Private First Class May 30, 1919 until discharge.

 

February 20, 1919 – Chester Bennett arrives safely back to his base in Virginia. He is with the 69th coast artillery.

 

The 69th Artillery, C.A.C. was formed in May of 1918 from the Coast Defenses of Puget Sound, Washington at Ft.Worden. In August of 1918 the Regiment was moved to Camp Mills, NY in preparation to sailing to France. On August 15th 1918 the Regiment moved to Port of Embarkation Philadelphia and sailed where they arrived 31 August 1918 in France.

While in France the 69th was stationed at O&T Center No. 1 (Operations and Training), Libourne, France. The 69th was one regiment of the 36th Brigade C.A.C. The Regiment was assigned to the American 5-inch Seacoast Gun. These guns were removed from fixed emplacements in the United States and placed on special mobile mounts for use in France. Twenty-six of these units had been assembled and sent to France. The regiment trained five months in Libourne with the new 5-inch seacoast guns, for which they had no ammunition, and did not get to the Front at all.

The Regiment left Pauillac, France on 3 February 1919 and arrived at Newport News, VA on 18 February 1919 and went to Camp Stuart and then to and Camp Eustis, Virginia where they were demobilized.

 

 

Honorably discharged: July 8, 1920; abolishment of R.A. Reserve

 

Residence: Ellensburg, Washington

 

Enlisted in R A at Ft.George Wright, Washington, February 24, 1917. Born in Ada, Minn, age 24 3/12 years

 

Organization 3 CoC A C Puget Sound, Ft. Worden, Washington May 20, 1918; Btry B 69 Arty C A C to February 27, 1917; 7 Co CAC Puget

 

Grades: Pvt 1c1 April 10, 1917, Pvt 1c1 May 30 1917.

 

Served overseas: August 15, 1918 to February 18, 1919

 

Honorably disch. July 8, 1920; Abolishment of RA Reserve.

 

Reenters the U.S. Army – date unknown

 

In the summer of 1940 Uncle Chester was transferred to the Philippines where he was a subordinate of Col. Charles A. Willoughby (later Major General) who was General MacArthur’s G-2 (Army Intelligence).

 

Bonnie and Chester Bennett lived within the walls of the Old Spanish city in Manila.  Intramuros, Manila’s old walled city, built during 333 years of Spanish occupation is now one of most popular tourist venues. Nearly destroyed during World War II (it was the base of operations for the Japanese occupying forces)

it remains today a testimony to both the horror of war, centuries of occupation by foreign forces (Spanish and American) and the victories and strength of the Filipino people.

 

Photo caption written by Bonnie of their Manila house: Our home on the second floor. Our bed sets across the corner shown here so that we get the breeze from the windows on the two sides.

 

Photo caption written by Bonnie on a photo of half naked African Negroids: These Negritos taken at Ft. Stotsenburg are dessed the way everyone should dress in this climate. An African Negroid type. They are not considered smart, but they are much smarter than we are in the matter of clothing.  (The U.S. Army was dressing in wool uniforms.)

 

(FortStotsenburg is situated at Barrio Sapang Bato in AngelesCity and is approximately 50 miles north of Manila. This was one of the locations where, under the National Defense Act of 1935, coastal artillery training was conducted. It was named after Colonel John M. Stotsenburg, a Captain of the Sixth U.S. Cavalry, and a Colonel of the First Nebraska Volunteers who was killed while leading his regiment in action near Quingua, Bulacan, the Philippines on April 23, 1899.)

 

Aunt Bonnie had accompanied Uncle Chester to the Philippines, but returned along with most of the army dependents in October of 1941. After Pearl Harbor he was assigned to lead an element of the II Philippine Corps as a 1st Lt. December 16, 1941 during the Battle of Bataan.

 

Later, February 26, 1942, Chester was transferred to HQ 41st Division of the Philippine Army, promoted to captain. Replacing A Major Frasier at which duty he continued until April 9, 1942. When the Bataan forces were surrendered. Uncle Chester endured the infamous death march, but eventually succumbed to dysentery at Camp #1 Cabanatuan, P.I. November 27, 1942.

 

After Aunt Bonnie returned from the Philippines, she was a telephone operator (she and Aunt Ruth had been operators for a number of years at the Opportunity Telephone Office) at Fort George Wright, Spokane. She became acquainted with the Jehovah Witness through a classmate of mine, Bram Trueman, whose father was an Army Major. Her sorrow was gradually redirected  by the pacifist elements of the J.W.s and she became convinced that Uncle Chester, as a career Army man lived by the sword and therefore died by the sword, ignoring the history of peace keeping activities of our military services. Due to this attitude, very little of Uncle Chester’s life was passed down to us.

 

During the period that Uncle Chester was staioned in Spoken in the 30s, he was a warrant Officer in charge of Army Recruiting with offices in the Ziegler Building. Outside the duty hours he was deeping interested in mining and prospected with an electronic detector which he constructed in his home shop up on Glass Avenue, Spokane. He and his good friend J. Richard Brown had considerable interest in the Deer Trail Monitor mlybdienum mine in Stevens County and were members of the Northwest Mining Association.

 

Dick Brown was a Communist or pro-Communist and Uncle Chester had leanings in that direction as was the popular concepts of those in Government service during the 30s. How this synchronized with the Free Enterprise thrust of his mining interests is difficult to conceive. It is ironic that he and fellow American soldiers and civilians were sacrificed by our political and military leaders while concentrating on the rescue of the USSR which refused to allow our operations against Japan on their soil because of the Russo-Japanese non-aggression pact.

 

The revised National Defense Act held promise of providing the United States with a reasonable military posture. But in practice, it turned out to be pure blue sky. In the ensuing years, Congress adamantly and consistently refused to give either the Army, the Reserves or the National Guard anywhere near reasonable support. Only one year after amending the Act, in 1921, Congress slashed the Regular Army by almost half, to 150,000 men, forcing one thousand qualified officers to resign. As the Roaring Twenties blew on, and a pacifist devil-may-care mood seized the country, Congress relentlessly whittled away at the Regular Army. Its average strenth in the years 1922 to 1929 was 137,300 officers and men. All attempts to maintain a viable enlisted Reserve failed because there was no draft or universal military training program to fill and sustain it. Similarly, Congress whacked away at the National Guard until it was barely able to maintain half its 435,000-man authorized strength. In sum, in the 1920s, we reverted to an absurdly inadequate Army attempting to scrape by in a nation that had grown hostile to anything “militaristic.”

 

The above was taken from Omar Bradley’s biography and illustrates the difficulty of staying in the Army. Uncle Chester went into peacetime with the rate of corporal. Most servicemen received temporary ranks or commissions during the war which were reduced to permanent ranks or rates at the end of hostilities encouraging many to leave the various services. I don’t know what Uncle Chester’s wartime rate was, but the fact that he had risen to Warrant Officer by the mid thirties indicates his value and proficiency in the Army.

 

A warrant officer (WO) is an officer in a military organization who is designated an officer by a warrant, as distinguished from a commissioned officer who is designated an officer by a commission. Warrant officers can and do command detachments, units, activities, vessels, aircraft, and armored vehicles as well as lead, coach, train, and counsel subordinates. However, the Warrant Officer’s primary task as a leader is to serve as a technical expert, providing valuable skills, guidance, and expertise to commanders and organizations in their particular field.

 

After his initial Spokane assignment he was transferred to the Presidio, San Francisco, where Granma and Aunt Ruth visited Aunt Bonnie and Uncle Chester. Later he was stationed at Fort Lawton where I spent a year or so with Aunt Bonnie and Uncle Chester during Dad’s trouble arising from the folding of the Opportunity State Bank. Eventually he was again stationed in Spokane for a number of years before he and Aunt Bonnie were transferred to the Philippines.

 

Written by: Bernard Eugene Shureman, Bonnie Bennett’s nephew. His mother, Charlotte “Lottie” Marie Bennett Schureman, was Bonnie’s sister. Uncle Chester was the positive male role model for Bernard while growing up. Bernard lived with Bonnie and Chester for about two years while they were stationed at Fort Lawton in Seattle

——————–

The Philippines attacked by the Japanese – December 8, 1941

Sgt. Bennett is promoted from the rank of warrant officer to First Lieutenant on December 16, 1941 – 8 days after the attack.

On December 29, 1941 Lt. Bennett is assigned to duty with Provost Marshall, II Philippine Corps

Retreating from the Japanese beachhead of Lingayen Gulf, Allied forces withdraw onto the Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor by January 1942, where they defend the entrance to Manila Bay.

On February 26, 1942 Lt. Bennett is ordered to Headquarters 41st Division P.A. (Public Affairs) as a replacement for Major Fraser who had been killed in action.

On April 9, 1942 – the 70,000 troops on Bataan surrender.

 

On May 6, CorregidorIsland, in the middle of ManilaBay, surrenders after months of relentless Japanese bombing.

Lt. Chester Bennett is captured by the Japanese and sent on the Bataan Death March, along with 70,000 weakend and sick American and Filipino troops. The Japanese had arrived on Luzon with 50,000 fresh troops and several tanks. The Americans had little choice if any of them were going to survive. The Japanese losses sustained from 1 January -30 April and from the initial assault landings on 5 -6 May, resulted in losses of about 900 dead and 1,200 wounded, while the American defenders suffered 800 dead and 1,000 wounded. The 11,000 defenders of Corregidor held out against intense Japanese bombardment until 6 May 1942, with some 12,000 shells crashing onto the island every 24 hours…

October 6, 1942 Chester Bennett is promoted to Captain at the Cabanatuan Prison Camp.

Died November 27, 1942 as a POW at the Cabanatuan Prison Camp of dysentery.

 

In late 1945, the bodies of the American troops who died at the camp were exhumed, and the men moved to other cemeteries. Families were given choices of either reinturnment in the Philippines in National Cemeteries or be returned home. The Bennett family chose to have Chester’s body returned to Washington state.

 

Land was donated in the late 1990s by the Filipino government to create a memorial to the POWs of Bataan. The site of the Cabanatuan Camp is now a park that includes a memorial wall listing the 2,656 American prisoners who died there.

 

Pacific POW Roster BENNETT CHESTER O,

1stLT, O&890007,AGD,,521,  (501,PW Camp #1 – Cabanatuan 1-2-3 Nueva Province Luzon Philippines 15-121)

Cap. Bennett’s body is returned to the U.S. – Graveside Service – Friday, May 13, 1949 – PinesCemetery – Spokane/Opportunity, Washington

 

 

Probably one of the last letters written by Bonnie Bennett. She died in 1978. Part of the letter is missing, including the salutaion:

 

…take care of. Lola has been home taking care of them. Chuck got the cast off his leg, has to be off his feet for a week. Dickie has a bad cold. I am feeling better after getting over the shock of knowing I had two cancers. I am not letting it get me down. I have been very tired and sleep a lot.

 

I plan on leaving Jan. 7, I will not enjoy the trip alone but I will make the best of it, and will be glad when it is over. It takes three days to get a check up, have to back six months. I want to thank you for the nice candy.

 

How nice the pictures of your house were. You must be very busy. We have snow on the ground, but raining coming down fast. Maybe freeze tonight.

 

Love Bonnie

===========================

 

From Lisa J. Schureman – Bonnie Bennett’s grandniece – November 2011.

 

Bonnie Adelaide Bennett was born 12 Sept 1892, Vassar, Tuscola   County, MI, to Elmer William Bennett & Mary Jane Dean, the eldest of four sisters.  She attended school in KootenaiCounty after her family moved to Idaho between 1902-before Sept 1903.  She is mentioned in the Northern Idaho News as doing a recitation “The Blue and the Gray” for the 4th of July in Colburn, ID.  Like her sisters she took violin classes but unlike them you never hear of her playing in public nor was it ever mentioned that she played seriously.  She went to WSU for a prep class, in what it doesn’t say.  She married Chester,  22 June 1919, Opportunity, Washington, in the Bennett home.  It was a very large home with plenty of land out back – some of which was in orchard.

 

The Lottie Bennett named as witness on the marriage certificate is my grandmother, Charlotte Marie Bennett, Ruth Idaho Bennett, the next youngest also served as a telephone operator.

 

Chester & Bonnie were active members of Orchard Masonic Lodge in Opportunity.  I know that at one time they lived in Seattle as my father was sent to live with them for two years while his mother went back to college to get teaching certification so she could support her family when the banks crashed.

 

In June 1931 they left for California but were back in Opportunity
by Jan. 1937 and went on a long trip back east with Bonnie’s sister, now Ruth Leonard and their mother.  They were heading for the Philippines in the Summer of 1940 and Bonnie went with Chester.  She was sent home June 1941 and nearly had their house completed and he was counting the days to retirement.

 

A letter mailed 19 Nov 1941 to my Grandmother was the last that the family heard from him.  The household goods were shipped from Manila and torpedoed.  The only thing that made it to Spokane was an ornate, hand carved, camphor-wood chest that now sits in our living room.

 

Bonnie had been planning to meet Chester for New Year’s in San Francisco.  Until I started combing through old newspapers and finding stuff my Dad had stashed away we were unaware that his body had been returned to Opportunity for burial.  Later on one of the men that served with Chester came to see Bonnie and in the process converted her to Jehovah Witness. She’d been a member of Opportunity Presbyterian before her conversion.  She’d always mail “The Watchtower” to my parents after she was done with them and was always hoping to convert them.

 

All three Bennett sisters lived next to one another with my Gran’s house first, Bonnie’s single-story house next, followed by Ruth’s, so when we went to visit we just went house hopping.  The big field ran in back of all three houses so as kids we could run and simply squat down to hide in the tall grass.  Bonnie had sharp eyesight and could find anyone and anything even in all that grass.  Do to health issues she had to have a hysterectomy when she was quite young otherwise there probably would have been children.  She enjoyed having us around and we have some pieces of petrified wood that she collected and kept in a dish on the livingroom coffee table.  The end of her life was quite sad though, as she was on medication for various health issues and fellow Witnesses were supplying her with wine.  She signed her estate away to them and when she went into hospital not a one of them came to see her.  When she died 23 Dec 1978, Spokane, WA,  they called my Grandmother and told her there was no money to pay for the funeral to which she replied, “That’s odd because you got it all.”  They did finally come across with the money to pay for her funeral, very grudgingly.

Bonnie was the first to die and it was like dominoes with Grandma in 1979, and Ruth in 1982.  I don’t know what became of the youngest sister, only that she was born in Colburn or Sandpoint, ID, August 1912.  First and last mention.

 

==================================

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 November 2011

 

 

 

Dear Larry,

 

These are articles and documents copied from my Bennett Genealogical notebook that I put together while researching the family.

 

I’m going to try and pass the photographic album to one of Llody’s sons so Lloyd can scan the photos he wants and put them on your website.

 

I’ll also send Chester’s father’s death certificate with the album as it dispelled the rumors that they were related.

 

Enjoy. I’ll ask my aunt about the chest. I know it cost $500.00 when it was bought.

 

 

Always,

 

Lisa J. Schureman (grandniece of Chester and Bonnie Bennett)

 

NEWS CLIPPINGS FROM THE BENNETT FAMILY ALBUM

Miss Bennett is 19 years old – heading off to college

 

 

Northern      Idaho News

14 February 1911

 

Miss Bonnie Bennett left here Friday,     the tenth, for the WashingtonState college at Pullman, her father accompanying her. She     will enter the preparatory class.

Northern      Idaho News

26 January 1906

 

The small child of Mr. Elmer Bennett is     reported quite ill. Dr. Page is in attendance.

 

 

Mff

 

Northern      Idaho News

10 October 1911

 

Kalispell,      Mont. — Miss Bonnie Bennett     and sisters, of Colburn, are Saturday callers in a course of violin     instruction from Miss Sullivan.

Northern      Idaho News

10 January 1911

Miss Bonnie Bennett and Mrs. T. S.     Gunderman, spent Thursday in Sandpoint doing shopping.

Northern      Idaho News

6 July 1906

 

COLBURN

COLBURN CELEBRATED

________

And All Who Remained in Town Enjoyed     Themselves.

     Colburn, July 5 — the Fourth of July     was celebrated here in a very enjoyable manner. Every one who remained in     town enjoyed the program which was rendered as follows:

Song. Marching Through Georgia,     school children. Recitation, The Blue and the Gray. Bonnie Bennett.

Ellensburg      Evening News

20 February 1919

 

Mrs. Dora Bennett received a wire      yesterday from her son Chester stating that      he had arrived safely in Virginia on his      return from France.      He is with the 69th coast artillery.

 

 

 

Ellensburg     Evening News

12 April 1919

Corp. Chester Bennett, left on No. 1     yesterday afternoon for Fort      Worden, where he will     be stationed. He stopped off here to spend a few hours with his mother,     Mrs. Dora Bennett.

Ellensburg     Evening News

20 February 1919

 

Corp. Chester O. Bennett, who has been     visiting his mother, Mrs. Dora Bennett, for the past few days left today     for Spokane where he will spent a few days with friends before returning to     Camp Eustis, Va., where he is stationed in the regular army; his term of     service isn’t expiring for over a year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G. H. Q.

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES,

France, February 28, 1919

General Orders}

No. 38-A   }

 

 

MY FELLOW SOLDIERS:

 

Now that your service with the American Expeditionary Forces is about to terminate, I can not let you go without a personal word. At the call to arms, the patriotic young manhood of America eagerly responded and became the formible army whose decisive victories testify to its efficiency and its valor. With the support of the nation firmly united to defend the cause of liberty, our army has executed the will of the people with resolute purpose. Our democracy has been tested, and the forces of autocracy have been defeated. To the glory of the citizen-soldier, our troops have faithfully fulfilled their trust, and in a succession of brilliant offensives have overcome the menace to our civilization.

 

As an individual, your part in the world war has been an important one in the sum total of our achievements. Whether keeping lonely vigil in the trenches, or gallantly storming the enemy’s stronghold; whether enduring monotonous drudgery at the rear or sustaining the flight line at the front, each has bravely and efficiently played his part. By willing sacrifice of personal right’s by cheerful endurance of hardship and privations; by vigor, strength and indomitable will, made effective by thorough organization and cordial co-operation, you inspired the war-worn Allies with new life and turned the tide of threatened defeat into overwhelming victory.

 

With a consecrated devotion to duty and a will to conquer, you have loyally served your country. By your exemplary conduct a standard has been established and maintained never before attained by any army. With mind and body as clean and strong as the decisive blows you delivered against the foe, you are soon to return to the pursuits of peace. In leaving the scenes of your victories, my I ask that you carry home your high ideals and continue to live as you have served — an honor to the principles for which you have fought and to the fallen comrade you leave behind.

 

It is with pride in our success that I extend to you my sincere thanks for your splendid service to the army and to the nation.

 

 

Faithfully,

 

 

John J. Pershing

Commander in Chief.

 

 

Official:

Robert C. Davis,

Adjutant General.

 

 

Copy furnished to                                

 

                             

                             

Commanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellensburg Evening Record

18 June 1919

 

SOCIETY

To Marry Spokane Girl

______

 

Word      has been received here of the coming marriage of Corp. Chester Bennett,      which will take place Sunday, June 22nd to Miss Bonnie Bennett      of Spokane at the Bennett home there.

Corporal Bennett is with the United      States Recruiting service in Spokane.      He is the son of Mrs. Dora Bennett, and made his home in Ellensburg the      greater part of his life. He recently returned from overseas.

Mrs. Dora Bennett, mother of Corp.      Bennett, will leave Friday for Spokane      to attend the wedding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No.A 25761

 

Marriage License.

To any Minister of the Gospel within this State,

Judge of Supreme or Superior Court,

Or Justice of the peace within this county.

YOU ARE HEREBY AUTHORIZED TO JOIN IN

HOLY MATRIMONY

   Chester O. Bennett                 and      Bonnie Bennett                              

 

City of        Opportunity          City of       Opportunity                              

State of            Wash.              State of      Wash                                 

and certify the same according to law.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed

My official seal at my office this                21st              day of

          June             1919

                              C P Kelnan                         J. A. Stewart                                                        

Deputy      Auditor of Spokane County, Washington

 

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

27 April 1923

______________________

 

Mrs. A. V. Smith and two children of Essex, Mont.,     spent Saturday night and Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett.

1923 and 1924

SpokaneValley Herald

6 June 1924

________________________

 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett, Mr. and      Mrs. C. E. Noble and Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Dunn camped near Peach Saturday      and Sunday.

 

 

 

SPOKANE VALLEY HERALD, JUNE 19, 1925

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“The Party Who Called You Has Hung—“

___________________________________________________

Insert Picture Here

___________________________________________________

    Do you swear at these young ladies? If you a man and lose your temper because someone at the other end of the line hangs up on you, you probably do. For these are the operators at the Orchard telephone exchange and they “have the number” of more than on short tempered subscriber.

When this picture was taken the switchboards went unattended for the first time since the exchange was established thirteen years ago. The photographer placed his camera and posed the girls not required at the boards. When all was ready the girls on duty left their patrons in the midst of their conversations, dropped their headphones and dashed outside to take their places in the group. It is apparent that the camera man snapped the picture before the last arrivals had time to wink an eye.

When the operators reached their stations again a moment later the boards were a blaze of lights signaling from impatient subscribers and one lady was calling from a neighbor’s phone to report that she hadn’t been able to get central for half an hour.

The Orchard operators are all local girls making their home in the community. From left to right they are: Mabel Olsen, Bonnie Bennett, Sue Coates, Ruth Elsom, Helen Dunn, Vesta Shaw, Bertha Payne, Chief operator, Luvia Marks, Marie Ingles, Ruth Bennett, Gladys Haile, Veva Braden, Gladys Raymond.

 

1925

SpokaneValley Herald

25 December 1925

 

 

Clubs and Lodges

OPPORTUNITY     MASONS NAME

YEAR’S     OFFICERS

Orchard Lodge Elects

Chest Gilbert as Head of Organization.

_______

 

Orchard lodge No.     200 F. A. M. held their annual election of officers last Wednesday evening.     Those chosen to head the lodge during the coming year are: Worshipful     Master, Chester A. Gilbert; Senior Warden, Chester O. Bennett; Junior     warden,

Arthur A. Billings; Treasurer, Dr. J. J. Walker; Secretary,     Harry E. Nelson; Senior deacon, Carl Polson; Junior deacon, Hubert C.     Jones; Marshal, Clarence E. Moffitt; Chaplain; Rev. A. B. Blades; Organist,     Weldon Williams; Senior Steward, James A. Mooney; Junior Steward, A. Bell;     Tyler E. L. Allen.

SpokaneValley Herald

9 October 1925

_________________________

 

Leroy Marks, with A. Wheeler and Bill     Holland of Greenacres, went to Usk for the week-end. They took their guns     and brought home the usual number of birds. Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett     were 1guest of Mr. Marks at a pleasant dinner Monday evening.

SpokaneValley Herald

19 June 1925

_________________________

Mr.     and Mrs. Chester Bennett and Miss Ruth Bennett are on the coast for the     week. Mr. Bennett is attending Masonic Grand Lodge.

 

1926

 

 

Continued from other column

In the chest was     a goodly supply of table silver, the gift of the Walnut telephone office     operators and others. Those present were Mrs. Kunkle, Mrs. Glenn Downing,     Mrs. Arthur Payne, Mrs. Roy Payne, Miss Alma Acton, Miss Susie Coates, Mrs.     Kenneth Dunn, Mrs. Chester Bennett, Mrs. Roger McCormick, Miss Rught     Bennett, Miss Berniece Brown, Miss Ethel Foster, Miss Gladys Haile, Miss     Mabel Olsen, Mrs. W. W. Halle, Miss Vesta Shaw, Miss Luvia Marks, Mrs.     Franklin French, Mrs. T. F. Raymond, Mrs. H. A. Raymond and Miss Gladys     Raymond.

SpokaneValley Herald

8 October 1926

 

“Treasure Hunt” at

Opportunity Party

______

Mrs. O. E.     Kunkle Honor Guest at Raymond      Home — Receives Many     Gifts.

______

 

Miss Gladys     Raymond entertained Friday evening at a shower for Mrs. O. E. Kunkle,     formerly Miss Bertha Payne. A “treasure hunt”, was introduced by a small     pirate. Impersonated by Richard Raymond, who presented Mrs. Kunkle with a     chart, showing the location of the treasure.

Various small     articles of kitchenware were hidden with the different clews, which led the     guest of honor on and on until the treasure chest was discovered.

SpokaneValley Herald

25 June 1926

 

Opportunity

______

 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett spent      Sunday and Monday at Ellensburg.

SpokaneValley Herald

19 November      1926

__________________________

 

Chester Bennett returned home Monday      evening from Sacheen       Lake, where he spent      several days with a party of hunters.

 

 

1926 and 1927

 

Continued     from other column:

 

Materials should     be the means of reminding us of this omission. A. D. Boughton of Dishman,     who furnishes the sand and gravel      for the Herald building, applied for an interest in the building,     but instead of selling him the five bricks his $5 subscription order     entitled him to, we decided that he should have credit for the mortar that     went with the two hundred or more bricks already sold. It is easy to see     that this building will be built the right way and of substantial     construction.

Those who helped with the building this     week by paying their subscriptions are:

A D. Boughton (5     bricks)

C. T. Mahan

Byron Martin

John Deignen

Leroy Monroe

Horticultural     Office

  1.     H.     Wightman

Paul     Priest

John     Dean

Gene     Kenney

II.     Caratens (2 bricks)

Chester Bennett

Dr.     J. J. Walker

  1. M. Lockwood (2 bricks)

W.     B. Dishman

T.     O. Ramsey (2 bricks)

A.     H. Syverson (2 bricks)

Carl     Peterson

J.     T. Collins

 

SpokaneValley Herald

24 December      1926

___________________________

 

Clubs and Lodges

____________________________

CHESTER      BENNETT HEADS ORCHARD MASONIC LODGE

 

     Chester Bennett of Opportunity was      chosen Worshipful Master of the Orchard Lodge No. 200 F. A. M. at the      annual election last Wednesday evening. Other officers elected are: Senior      warden, Arthur A. Billings; Junior Warden, H. C. Jones; secretary, Harry      Raymond, and treasure, Sidney E. Smith.

 

 

1927 and 1929

 

SpokaneValley Herald

11 March 1927

___________________________

 

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Bennett are making      a trip to California.      They will be gone until April 1St.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farewell Party     For Mrs. Bonnie Bennett

                   

Mrs.     Bonnie Bennett was the honored guest at a farewell party given last     Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Bessie Kilgore.

Mrs. Bennett has been in the Home     Telephone company service 13 years and is resigning on June 13, and 13     guests were at the party, so the number 13 was featured.  Decorations were pink and yellow.  Guests included employees in the     telephone office, Mrs. Bertha Keinkle, Mrs. Lillian Stultz, Mrs. Layne     Truell, Mrs. Gladys Osborne, Mrs. Mabel Moyfitt, Mrs. Marie Reynells, Mrs.     Onie Heirgood, Mrs. Helen Dunn, Miss Susie Coates, Miss Ruth Bennett, and     Miss Ethel Foster.

 

SpokaneValley Herald

18 February 1927

___________________________

 

Mortar     for Those Bricks

_______

 

     While friends of the Herald from far and     near have been showering us with bricks, so to speak, apparently no one had     thought of how we were to hold these bricks together and build them into a     solid structure which would survive the years. It is not surprising that a     man who deals in such materials should be the means of reminding us of this

SpokaneValley Herald

17 October 1929

 

PAST MASTER’S NIGHT

WEDNESDAY

                  

Past     masters of Orchard Lodge, No. 200, F. A. M., will be the guests of honor at     a Past Masters’ night, observed next Wednesday evening, December 3, by the     lodge.

Dinner     will be served at 6:30 by the ladies of the Eastern Star, – after which     there will be a short program.

The     first degree will be conferred upon a class of candidates at 8:00, the     following past masters officiating:      Harry Raymond, worshipful master; Charles Olinger, senior warden;     Elwyn L. Allen, junior warden; Chester O. Bennett, senior deacon/ Clarence     Moffitt, junior deacon; Channon Price, senior steward; Hubert Jones, junior     steward; (unreadable) “All Masons of the Valley are cordially invited,”     said Garry D. King, master of the lodge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1931, 1932 and 1934

 

SpokaneValley Herald

11 June 1931

 

BENNETTS     GOING TO CALIFORNIA

 

              

 

Victory Chapter Gives

Farewell Party.

              

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett,     opportunity, were guests of honor at a party given Monday evening by     Victory chapter, O. E. S., of which Mrs. Bennett is a charter member and     Mr. Bennett, a past worthy patron.      Officers of the chapter who served with Mr. Bennett were hosts for     the affair.

Mr. Bennett, who is a recruiting     officer for the United States Army, has been promoted to a position in the San Francisco     post.  They plan to leave Saturday     for their new location.

SpokaneValley Herald

10 November 1934

                        

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of Seattle     arrived Saturday to spend a week with Mrs. Bennett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs.     E. W. Bennett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

11 August 1932

                        

 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett are     visiting Mrs. Bennett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bennett and family.

Mr. Bennett has been transferred from San Francisco to Seattle,     and is having month’s furlough.                

BENNETT     GIVES FLAG

         

     Chester Bennett, recruiting officer for     the United States Army, has presented the Opportunity     school with a large wool flag, 18 by 36 inches.

The presentation took place last Friday     when a patriotic demonstration was held in connection with a fire drill.

SpokaneValley Herald

22 June 1934

                   

     Mrs. R. E. McCann attended the Eastern     Star Grand Lodge at Tacoma.  She also visited Mr. and Mrs. Chester     Bennett in Seattle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1934, 1935, 1936 and 1937

SpokaneValley Herald

5 October 1934

                             

 

Mrs. Chester Bennett, who has been the     guest of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bennett for three weeks has returned to her     home in Seattle.  Mr. Bennett came Saturday and returned     with his wife.     

SpokaneValley Herald

27 December 1934

                        

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of Seattle     are spending the holidays with Mrs. Bennett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. W.     Bennett.

SpokaneValley Herald

28 February 1936

                        

Opportunity

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett returned     to their home in Seattle     Sunday afternoon after a few days visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles     Leonard.

SpokaneValley Herald

17 April 1936

                   

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of Seattle     were guests the first of the week of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bennett.

SpokaneValley Herald

12 July 1935

                   

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of Seattle     were week‑end guests of Mrs. Bennett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. W.     Bennett.

SpokaneValley Herald

27 December 1935

                   

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of Seattle     spent the week with Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bennett and family.

 

1937

SpokaneValley Herald

15 January 1937

                   

LODGE     MEMBER HAVE ELK DINNER

 

     Orchard Lodge No. 200 will meet at Opportunity on Wednesday, January 20, for an elk     dinner being furnished and cooked by John Connors and Chester Bennett.

At the meeting will be visiting grand     lodge officers. James P. Dillard will be the principal speaker.

It will be the first meeting under the     direction of the new officers.  All     lodge members are invited.

 

SpokaneValley Herald

10 October 1937

                                  

Masons Note Services

Of Past Leaders

                   

Bennett     to Describe Recent Visit to East and Famous Old Lodge in Alexandria, October 6

              

 

     Among noteworthy Masonic gatherings of     Valley was Orchard Lodge’s masters’ night, Wednesday evening, when 12 past     masters of the order were present.      Thomas Bienz conferring the degrees.

Next Wednesday, October 6, Chester     Bennett will be the speaker at Orchard Lodge, describing his recent trip     east, and the different lodges he visited.      The most famous was George Washington lodge at Alexandria, VA.

SpokaneValley Herald

13 August 1937

              

BENNETTS     ON LONG TRIP

              

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bennett of     Spokane, Mrs. Charles Leonard and their mother, Mrs. E. W. Bennett,     Opportunity, left Saturday morning to visit relatives in Michigan.

Before returning home Mr. and Mrs.     Bennett will visit in New York and Washington, spending     six weeks in the East.

Mrs. Leonard plans to take delivery of     a new car and, with her mother, drive home in about three weeks.

SpokaneValley Herald

10 September 1937

                   

 

Victory     O.E.S., to Celebrate Its 19th Anniversary,

Honor     Founders

              

Victory     Chapter, O.E. S., will celebrate its 19th anniversary Monday     night in the lodge hall at Opportunity.

Charter     member of the organization, now living in the Valley, will be special     guests of honor. (Cont.’d)

Continued from other     column.

 They include E. L. Allen, Mrs. J. B.     Felts, Mrs. C. C. Hills, C. H. Olinger, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Moffitt, Mrs. A.     B. Houk, C. F. Stokes, Mrs. Lulu Raymond, Mrs. George Osborne, Mrs. Nannie     Gore, Mr. and Mrs. W. G Hand, Mrs. Mary Polar and Mrs. Chester Bennett.

Presiding     will be Mrs. Velma Cole, worthy matron and A. O. Woolard, worthy patron.

 

 

 

 

1937 – 1941

SpokaneValley Herald

15 October 1937

                   

FATHER/SON     BANQUEST SET

              

Annual     Masonic Affair

Devoted     to Boy Scouts

              

 

     Orchard Lodge, Masonic Order of     Opportunity, will give its first father and son banquet next Wednesday     evening, October 20, in the lodge hall at Opportunity     at 6:30.

At the meeting of the lodge last     Wednesday, Chester Bennett described his eastern trip and visit to     interesting lodges in Virginia     and other states.

SpokaneValley Herald

7 June 1940

                                               

STAR HONORS

C.O. BENNETTS

    

     Mr. and Mrs. Chester O. Bennett, who     are leaving soon for the Philippines,     will be special guests at the meeting Victory Chapter, O.E.S., at the     regular session to be held Monday evening in the Opportunity     hall.  Mrs. Bennett is a charter     member of the organization and Mr. Bennett a past patron.

A special program will be presented and     a social hour with Mrs. O. D. Reinemer as general chairman.

(Continued     from other column.)

 

Inez Hill Bailey,     worthy matron, and Lloyd F. Knight, worthy patron will preside.

This     will be the final spring meeting of the chapter, which will recess until     September.

 

GOES     TO ISLANDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Insert photo here!

                        

24 April 1940

Chester     O. Bennett, master sergeant in the recruiting service, who has been     enlisting men for the army here most of the time since the World War, has     been ordered to the Philippines     as a warrant office in the regular army.

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

6 June 1941

              

     Mrs.     Chester Bennett arrived Sunday from Manila     where her husband is stationed with the United States Arms.

 

 

 

 

 

Chester Bennett’s last known letter send from the Philippines just days before the Japanese attacked on December 8, 1941.

————————————-AIR MAIL—————————————–

HEADQUARTERS PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE DEPARTMENT COMMANDER,

MANILA, P. I.

November 19, 1941

Dear Lottie:    (Charlotte Bennett – Sister of Bonnie.)

 

It was so sweet of you to remember my birthday with a letter. Nothing could have been more appreciated, though it should be definitely understood that it is almost impossible to get along without “Time” here at what is known as the “Crossroads of the Pacific” or the “Pearl of the Orient” or just plain pain in the neck.

 

And your birthday is just ten days away. I have gotten something for you, but because Bonnie had to pay duty once it seems best to bring it home with me, rather than mail it and make you pay the duty. Christmas gifts will be inexpensive as it is costing me too much to get back home again, but I couldn’t treat you that way on your birthday.

 

I almost threw a celebration of my own when I learned that you had gotten the money necessary to complete the house. You have lived in the old house so long and it has been so inadequate that it seemed to me you deserved a new house, complete. I am so sorry that I am not there to help with it and so happy that I seem to be included in plans for its enjoyment. It certainly is nice to be remembered so well.

 

A Clipper is arriving this afternoon and I feel sure that there will be a letter for me. It is a miserable job waiting from one mail to the next. I suppose that Bonnie gets quite as impatient as I do. The difference is that I know every postponement while she does not. About three more Clippers and I will be through with this waiting business — and does the thought please me.

 

————————————-AIR MAIL————————————-

————————————-AIR MAIL————————————-

 

 

Wish there were some way to ship you some of the excess heat there now. Imagine, almost the last of November and a sheet almost too much to sleep under in a house with the walls all kicked out. A coat is always too much, but in the decent places around town it is required. Right now I am sweating (or do horses only do that). Sleeping and eating were difficult for me at home in hot weather. Here they are difficult all the time. And in another six weeks I will be bundled up in woolens and unable to keep warm.

 

SATURDAY MORNING:

The Clipper leaves tomorrow morning so this had better be finished right now.

Manila had a blackout last night, lasting from six p.m. to six a.m. There was a sliver of moon in the early evening, but when that went down the place was really dark. With almost no traffic moving the horns were silent, making it an excellent night for sleep and as the night was cool I got in a night such as I seldom have. In the darkness I set up a folding screen in an unstable manner with the result that I found it had fallen in the night but I had slept so well that I knew nothing of it.

Don’t lavish all your affection on your boy friends. Having been away from the ladies for six months, just a little affection from you well be appreciated beyond words when I get back, probably the last of January. Am giving Bonnie the details which you can get from her.

Here’s wishing for you a lot of pleasant birthdays, and may we be able to enjoy them together.

 

 

With much affection,

Chester

————————————-AIR MAIL—————————————–

1942

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

April 1942

                        

 

PRISONER OF WAR

                                                           

 

     First Lieutenant Chester O. Bennett has     been reported a Japanese prisoner of war in the Philippines, according to an     announcement of the war department received through the Associated Press.     Lieutenant Bennett, who went to the islands as a warrant office in the     regular army in April, 1940, was formerly in the recruiting service     here.  His wife, Mrs. Chester O.     Bennett, lives at Opportunity.

 

SpokaneValley Herald

18 September 1942

                   

 

VICTORY     CHAPTER HAS

SERVICE     SHIELD

 

     Victory Chapter, O.E.S. dedicated its     service shield last Monday evening honoring members and relatives, who are     in the armed services.

Mrs. Lyle Bailey presented the names     and stars were mounted for Chester O. Bennett, past patron of the chapter.

 

 

 

AMERICAN PRISONER HEADQUARTERS,

CAMP NO. 1, CABANATUAN, P. I.

October 6, 1942.

     As G1 of the 2nd Philippine Corps I certify the following in regard to the status of first lieutenant Chester O. Bennett, #0-890007 A.G.D.

 

Lieutenant Bennett was commissioned as first lieutenant from the grade of warrant officer on December 16, 1941. He was assigned to II Philippine Corps on December 29, 1941 and assigned to duty with Provost Marshall, II Philippine Corps. He was recommended in two separate letters for promotion to grade of Captain by his Commanding Officer and recommendations were approved by C.G. II Philippine Corps and forwarded to C.G. U.S.A.F.F.E. No action was taken on either recommendation. On February 26, he was ordered to Headquarters 41st Division P.A. as a replacement for Major Fraser, killed in action. During March he was again recommended by two separate letters for promotion to the grade of Captain by his commanding officer. He was performing the duties commiserate with the grade of Captain or higher and a vacancy existed for his promotion. His recommendations were forwarded approved by C.G. II Philippine Corps, but no action was taken by H.Q. U.S.A.F.F.E or H.Q. U.S.F.I.P. until April 9, 1942, the date of surrender of the forces in Bataan.

 

Lieutenant Bennett fulfilled every specification for promotion in accordance with regulations laid down by Higher Headquarters. It is believed his promotion was overlooked in the confusion and unusual condition resulting from the acute tactical situation.

 

 

 

O.O. WILSON,

Lieut.Col., G.S.C.

 

 

WAR DEPARTMENT

The Adjutant General’s Office

WASHINGTON

March 16, 1943.

In Reply

Refer To   AG 201    Bennett, Chester O.

(3-11-43) PC-N 070122-2

 

Mrs. Chester O. Bennett

Opportunity, Washington

 

 

Dear Mrs. Bennett:

 

Report has been received that your husband,

 

First Lieutenant Chester O. Bennett, 0-890007, Adjutant General’s Department, is now a prisoner of war of the Japanese Government in the Philippine Islands. This will confirm my telegram Of March 14, 1943.

 

The Provost Marshal General, Prisoner of War Information Bureau, Washington, D.C., will furnish you the address to which mail may be sent. Any future correspondence in connection with his status as a prisoner of war should be addressed to that office.

 

 

 

Very Truly yours,

J. A. Ulio

Major General,

The Adjutant General.

1 Enclosure.

Memorandum re financial benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATES PUBLISHED UNKNOWN – AFTER 23 July 1943

(Cont.’d)

 

and ultimately     to a captaincy because of his service in the artillery during World War I.     Captain Bennett became a prisoner of the Japanese in the surrender of     General Wainwright.

The captain took an active interest in     mining. He was the lessee and directing operator of a property adjoining the     Deer Trail Monitor in Stevens      County, this state,     and for many years attended nearly every luncheon meeting of the Northwest     Mining Assoc. Mrs. Bennett is reported to have been appointed a telephone     operator at Fort George Wright.

SPOKANE MINER

 DIES A CAPTAIN

______

Chester Bennett Was Stevens CountyLessee;     Passed On While Japanese Prisoner.

_______

     Captain Chester O. Bennett, about 51, a     veteran of two wars and a resident of Spokane and its environs since     boyhood, died a prisoner of the Japanese, his widow, Mrs. Bonnie Bennett,     was informed at the family home in Opportunity recently, J. Richard Brown,     an associate in mining, reveals.

A veteran of the first World War, Mr.     Bennett was in charge of the Spokane recruiting station in the Ziegler     building here for three or four years, with the rating of sergeant, up to     two or more years ago when ordered to the Philippines. He was a warrant     officer by reason of his services in the World War, it is said.

 

Was Artilleryman

     With Mrs. Bennett, he was residing in the western Pacific     until two months before the Pearl Harbor     tragedy, when all of the women were ordered to depart for their homes.

In the meantime, Sergeant Bennett had     been advanced to a lieutenancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1944

SpokaneValley Herald

16 June 1944

                                       

 

FLAG THAT HE DIED FOR FLOWN

IN REMEMBERANCE

                                       

 

     A large flag, 10 by 14 feet, which had      been a gift from Major Chester Bennett:       who dies in a Japanese prison camp, unfurled in the breeze and      alone in the sun on Flag Day, June 14, at the Opportunity      grade school, a potent reminder of what these men are fighting and dying      for.

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

16 June 1944

___________________________

FLAG THAT HE     DIED FOR FLOWN IN REMBEMBRANCE

______

            A large flag, 10 by 14 feet, which had     been a gift from Major Chester Bennett: who died in a Japanese prison camp,     unfurled in the breeze and alone in the sun on Flag day, June 14, at the Opportunity grade school, a potent reminder of what     these men are fighting and dying for.

 

1944

SpokaneValley     Herald

23 July 1944

___________________________

 

First Lieutenant

Chester O. Bennett

Dies in Jap Prison

________

 

Notification from the war department came     Wednesday of last week to Mrs. Bonnie Bennett of Spokane of the death of her husband,     First Lieutenant Chester O. Bennett, in a Japanese prison camp. The     information came for the Japanese government.

Lieutenant Bennett was sent to the Philippines     as a warrant officer three years ago. There, Mrs. Bennett later joined him     and they were together 10 months before fear of trouble caused the     government to order all women and children sent home. At this time     Lieutenant Bennett was to have bee retired in 10 days and would have been     on the high seas en route home when war was begun. Mrs. Bennett was making     plans to meet him New Year’s Day in San       Francisco.

              (Continued.)

 

 

(Continued     from last column.)

 

     Last word from the lieutenant himself     came before Pearl Harbor. After that there     was only the official communication from the Japanese that he was a     prisoner of war.

The service kept Lieutenant and Mrs.     Bennett for a number of years in Seattle and     San Francisco,     but both are well known in the Valley. For three years before the transfer     to the Philippines they     dame their home in Spokane.     Mrs. Bennett is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bennett of Opportunity, for 30 residents of the Valley.

Lieutenant Bennett was worshipful     master of Orchard Lodge No. 200, F.      A. M. in 1927. Later he served as secretary. In 1928 he was worthy     patron of Victory chapter O. E. S. No. 161 with Mrs. Alma Thayer worthy     matron.

Mrs.     Bennett has been with signal corps at Fort George Wright since last     September.

Sister of Mrs. Bennett are Mrs. Lottie     Bennett Schureman, living at the family home, and Mrs. Right Leonard, whose     home is next door that of her parents.

 

 

 

1944

BENNETT, Capt. Chester O. — He was a resident of       E12325 Valleyway, Opportunity, Wash. Survived by his wife, Mrs. Chester       O. Bennett at the home: 2 sisters, Mrs. Gertrude Smith and Mrs. Winnifred       Frizzle, both of Los Angeles, Calif. Family and friends will meet at the       SMITH FUNERAL HOME. W1124         Riverside Ave., Fri., May 13, at 2:30 p. m.       and go directly to the Pines cemetery in Opportunity       where graveside services will be held with Dr. Scott Bates officiating.

 

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

23 July 1944

                        

Valley     fair dates tentatively set for September 8-12.

Valley     has good protection, fire reports show.

First Lieutenant Chester O. Bennett dies in Jap prison.

Valley W. C. T. U. host to count unit at     Greenacres church.

A.T.     Dishman proposes free markets for Valley producers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capt. C. O. Bennett

 

Graveside     services for Capt. Chester O. Bennett will be held Friday afternoon at     Pines cemetery, Opportunity, with Dr.     Scott Bates officiating.

Captain     Bennett, whose body will be received by Smith Funeral home tomorrow, died     November 27, 1942, in a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines.

Captain     Bennett fought through the battle Bataan,     and later was on the “March of Death”. He was awarded the Bronze Star medal     posthumously.

He was     a veteran of World War I service in France.

He was     a past master of Orchard Masonic lodge and a past patron of Victory chapter     No. 161.

Before     leaving for manila, Captain Bennett had been with the army recruiting     officer here for 16 years.

Survivors     are his widow, Bonnie Bennett, E12325 Valleyway, and two sisters in Los Angeles.

Friends     will meet at the Smith funeral home Friday at 2:30 p. m. and proceed from     there to the graveside services.

 

Military Records of LowerValley     Soldiers

____________________________

14. Chester     O. Bennett, Private 1st Class. Home address Ellensburg, Wash.     Born November 6, 1892. Son of Mrs. Dora Bennett, and Elmer C. Bennett     (deceased) Mrs. Bonnie A. Bennett, wife. Entered service February 24, 1917.     Served with Battery B., 69th Rgt. C. A. C. Went overseas August     14. 1918. Promoted to Corporal October 22, 1917; reduced to transfer to     General Service Infantry.

 

Date Published Unknown

 

(Continued.)

 

within six     months after the first publication of this notice, or they will be forever     barred.

 

Date of the     first publication of this notice is the 16th day of June, 1944.

BONNIE A. BENNETT

Administratrix     of the above estate.

FRED J.     CUNNINGHAM, Attorney

1412 OldNational     BankBuilding,     Spokane, Wash.

6-16-7-7

 

 

1949

 

 

 

SpokaneValley Herald

16 June 1944

                        

 

FRED J. CUNNINGHAM

1412 Old National Bank Bldg.

No. 39235

 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

 

In the Superior     Court of the State of Washington, in and     for the Count of Spokane.

 

In the Matter of     the Estate of CHESTER     O. BENNETT, Deceased.

Notice     is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed Administratrix of     the above estate in this Court and has qualified accordingly, and that all     persons having claims against said deceased are required to serve claims,     duly verified, with necessary vouchers, upon the undersigned at South 364     Coeur d’Alene Street, Spokane, Washington, or upon Fred J. Cunningham, the     attorney of record, at his office at 1412 Old National Bank Building ,     Spokane, Washington, and file such claim with proof of such service in the     office of the Clerk of the above Court in the County

At his office at     1412 Old National Bank Building, Spokane, Washington, and file such claim     with proof of such service in the office of the Clerk of the of the above     Court in the County Court House at the City of Spokane, Washington within     six months after the first publication of this notice, or they will be     forever barred.

 

Date of the     first publication of this notice is the 16th day of June, 1944.

 

BONNIE A.     BENNETT

Administratrix     of the above estate.

 

FRED J.     CUNNINGHAM, Attorney

1412 OldNational     BankBuilding,     Spokane, Wash.

6-16-7-7

 

 

1978 – 1979

IN     LOVING MEMORY OF

BONNIE ADELAIDE BENETT

September 12, 1892                December     23, 1978

Funeral Services

 

10:00 AM.      Tuesday, December 26, 1978

Chapel of the Valley

South 1400       Pines Road – SpokaneValley

 

 

OFFICIATING

Mr. Harry Ball

 

VOCALIST

Judy Radabaugh

Vocal Selections

“Balsam In Gilead”

“Jehovah Is My     Shepard”

ORGANIST

Nancy Helgeston

Casket Bearers

Donald Dierks                                    Orville     Fuller

Percy Ott                                             Pete     Gilbert

Barney Lakin                                      Jim     Soares

 

Interment at

The PinesCemetery     — Opportunity

The     Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.      He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; he leadeth me beside the     still waters.  He restoreth my soul;     he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Yea,     though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no     evil:  for thou art with me; thy rod     and thy staff they comfort me.  Thou     preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: though     anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.  Surely, goodness and mercy shall follow     me all the days of my life:  and I     will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

23rd     Psalm

 

 

Spokane Valley Herald

Wednesday, January 3, 1979

                                                           

BONNIE BENNETT

 

Bonnie     A. Bennett, a resident of the Valley, passed away Dec. 23 at a local     nursing home.  She was 86.

She had lived here since 1912, coming to this area     from Vassar, Mich. Mrs. Bennett was member of     Opportunity Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses and a life member of     Victory chapter 161, Order of Eastern Star.

She is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Charles     Leonard, Mrs. Awald Meier, both Spokane      Valley; a niece; two     nephews.

Funeral services were held December 26 at Thorn     Hill Valley Funeral home. Burial was at The Pines Cemetery. The family     suggests memorial contributions to the church.

 

 

BROTHER OF SOUTH BAY WOMAN DIES IN JAP PRISON CAMP

 

Mrs. Winifred Fizell of 717 North Irena Avenue, Redondo Beach, has just received word through the American Red Cross of the death of her brother, Lt. Chester O. Bennett, in a prison camp in the Philippines. Lieutenant Bennett had made numerous visits to his sister here and had made many friends in the SouthBay area.

Lieutenant Bennett had been in the army since before the first World War and lacked only ten days before being retired when war was declared December 8, 1941. In July 1940, he had been sent to Manila and when that city fell, he was in action with his company. He was taken prisoner by the Japanese at the fall of Bataan.

No details of his death was given to his family and no direct word had come from him since December 24, 1941. The officer was a native of Ada, Minnesota, where he was born October 6, 1892. He was past master of the Masonic lodge and past worthy patron of the Eastern Star at Opportunity, Washington.

In addition to Mrs. Fizell, Lieutenant Bennett is survived by his widow, Bonnie Bennett of Spokane, and a second sister, Mrs. Gertrude Smith of Venice.

 

———————————————————

 

SPOKANE MINER DIES A CAPTAIN

Chester Bennett Was Stevens County Lessee; Passed On While Japanese Prisoner.

 

Captain Chester O. Bennett, about 51, a veteran of two wars and a resident of Spokane and its environs since boyhood, died a prisoner of the Japanese, his widow, Mrs. Bonnie Bennett, was informed at the family home in Opportunity recently, J. Richard Brown, an associate in mining, reveals.

A veteran of the first World war, Mr. Bennett was in charge of the Spokane recruiting station in the Ziegler building here for three or four years, with the rating of sergeant, up to two or more years ago when he was ordered to Philadelphia. He was a warrant officer by reason of his services in the World war, it is said.

 

Was Artilleryman.

 

            With Mrs. Bennett, he was residing in the western Pacific until two months before the Pearl Harbor tragedy, when all of the women were ordered to depart for their homes.

In the meantime, Sergeant Bennett had been advanced to a lieutenancy and ultimately to a captaincy because of his service in the artillery during World War I. Captain Bennett became a prisoner of the Japanese in the surrender of General Wainwright.

The captain took an active interest in mining. He was the lessee and directing operator of a property adjoining the Deertrail Monitor in StevensCounty, this state, and for many years attended nearly every luncheon meeting of the Northwest Mining Association. Mrs. Bennett is reported to have been appointed a telephone operator at Fort George Wright.

————————

 

 

 

 

 

We do not know for sure if Chester Bennett was captured on Bataan or if he was one the many  defenders who fled to Corregidor prior to the surrender of Bataan.

 

Probably the most important World War II icon in the Philippines, Corregidor is the island fortress standing guard at the mouth of ManilaBay. In the early days of WW II, it sheltered President Manuel Quezon, General Douglas MacArthur, and other key Philippine Commonwealth and American officials and their families. After their escape to Australia, a long, momentous and bloody battle took place on the small island. Filipino and American troops stubbornly held out in Corregidor until its fall.

 

Corregidor’s history is a result of its strategic location. During the Spanish era, it was the island where all ships entering or leaving Manila Bay stopped to have their papers checked and corrected, hence the name “corregidor,” which means “corrector” in Spanish. Fortifications, as well as a small barrio with a church, a school and houses for the residents, were established by the Spanish.

 

During the Filo-American War in 1898, the Americans first occupied the island, building a convalescent hospital for wounded troops. In 1906, they realized the strategic importance of the island and began a full-scale fortification program. By 1922, FortMills (as Corregidor was called then) was completely fortified, ready to protect Manila from any invasion.  Its fortifications were 20 years old and sadly outdated by the time of the Japanese invasion on December 8, 1941, one day after their deadly strike on the Hawaiian Islands.  The Corregidor fortifications were not designed or hardened against modern arial bombardments. After the fall of Manila and the Bataan Peninsular, thousands of Americans and Filos fled to the island, severely straining the small island’s water and food supply.

 

The Fall of Corregidor

 

The 11,000 defenders of Corregidor held out against intense Japanese bombardment until 6 May 1942. With some 12,000 shells crashing onto the island every 24 hours, sleep for the exhausted defenders was virtually impossible. Even huddled deep underground in the Malinta Tunnel, women and children bled from the ears from the concussive effect produced by the earthshaking explosions overhead. Food, water and ammunition had dropped to critical levels when the Japanese finally secured a beachhead on the island on 5 May, and landed tanks. On the next day, General Wainwright ordered the American flag lowered on Corregidor in the hope of avoiding a massacre. In a flagrant repudiation of international convention governing the treatment of prisoners of war, General Homma warned Wainwright during surrender negotiations that he would execute all prisoners of war unless the surrender applied not only to Corregidor but to all American and Philippine troops still resisting the Japanese on other islands of the Philippine archipelago. In the hope of avoiding reprisals against his troops, and the women and children under his care, Wainwright agreed.

 

The heroic defenders of Corregidor were subjected to the same appalling brutality that had been inflicted by the Japanese on the survivors of Bataan. American and Philippine troops suffered 16,000 casualties in the Battle of the Philippines, and 84,000 endured cruel imprisonment or execution at the hands of the Japanese. Of 20,000 American troops captured by the Japanese in the Philippines, about half died in captivity before the Pacific War ended. Some were murdered, others died from starvation, sickness or brutal treatment.

 

Many of the captives, including most likely Uncle Chester Bennett, were transferred by the Japanese to the infamous Cabanatuan prison camp on the Bataan Peninsular. In all of the wars which America has fought, few of our citizens have been called upon to make the sacrifices and endure the hardships of those who were held captive. The American men, women and children who were incarcerated at Cabanatuan prisoner of war camp in the Philippine Islands during World War II suffered cruel and inhumane treatment, resulting in over three thousand deaths between May 1942 and February 1945.

 

Although statistics never tell the whole story, this one goes a long way in describing what life was like for POWs in the Philippines: two out of every three soldiers alive at the time of the surrender did not live to see the end of the war. Although it’s impossible to find exact figures, roughly half of the 24,000 Americans and nearly three-quarters of the 64,000 Filipino troops died during the Japanese occupation. Most of them died while POWs in one of the many wretched prison camps spread throughout the Philippines and in labor camps in Japan.

 

There is a common misconception regarding the experiences of two different groups of American POWs. As described above, those captured with the bulk of the Luzon Force on Bataan — already in terrible condition after the long siege — were then subjected to the aptly named Death March, which ended at CampO’Donnell. In early June, most of them were then transferred to the camp at Cabanatuan, where they were joined by the men from Corregidor, which had surrendered on May 7. Although hardly in great shape themselves, the men from Corregidor had enjoyed better rations and avoided the Death March, putting them in a better position to withstand the rigors of the camps. The relative survival rates of the two groups bear this out.

 

On 30 January 1945, a battalion of 200 U.S. Army Rangers and Filipino Scouts stormed the Cabanatuan POW Camp, rescuing hundreds of American and British prisoners from almost certain death. Then, in a feat of equal daring, the Ranger force ushered the former POWs — many of them gravely ill — across miles of Japanese-held territory, back to American lines and freedom.

 

After evacuating every single prisoner, the Rangers led and carried the men to the riverbed where they were then loaded on carabao carts. Only twenty-five minutes had passed since the raid had begun, and now it was complete. A flare was fired into the air, alerting all Rangers that the assault was over. All that remained was the trek home. The Rangers were tired and many were popping “pep pills” or amphetamines that the army had provided. It took the Rangers only several hours to transport all of the newly freed men to safety. The American’s had advanced fifteen miles closer to Bataan, therefore the trek back to American lines was that much shorter. At eight o’clock in the morning fighter jets flew low over the men and tipped their wings, an aerial tribute to the men of Bataan. After three years of Hell, the prisoners of Cabanatuan were finally free.

 

But the heroic effort was too late to save Lt. Chester Bennett.

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing.

I found several biographies (online or publications) of former POWs who

spent time in this camp.

Some have letters fromPOW’s, Timelines, etc.

This one was very informative.

 

http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/philippines/cabanatuan_1.html

————————————

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 26, 2004

 

Name: Bennett, Chester O.

 

Serial # 0-890007

Rank: 1 Lt

Type of Casualty: DNB (died non-battle)          

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/wa/spokane/cemetery/pinesab.txt

 

1402 S. Pines Rd.Spokane, WA99206   Phone: 509-926-2753 T

The cemetery is located about 2 miles south of I-90 (exit #289) on State Route 27. The grounds are well maintained, with about 11,000 residents and the population is still growing.  The cemetery has about 300 new burials per year.

 

Pines Cemetery

 

Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

 

BENNETT, Bonnie A. b.1892     d.1978

 

BENNETT, Chester O. b.6 Nov 1892     d.27 Nov 1942    Capt WWI&II

—————————————

 

From Social Security Death Index;

 

BONNIE BENNETT   12 Sep 1892          Dec 1978

 

(Spokane, Spokane, WA)

————————————-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Smith <lsmith@wave.net>

To: <bpdesigns@earthlink.net>

Date: 9/18/2004 9:14:12 AM

Subject: Uncle Chet

 

Bev,

 

Grandma Smith maintained that her brother’s body was never recovered. In fact they did not even know the exact date of her brother’s death. Just “sometime in July.” So, while I was in the Philippines in 1987 I checked out the lists they have in the National Cemeteries for mention of the “missing”. He is not listed.

 

I then wrote the National Cemetery Commission and they responded that his body had been shipped back.

 

I contacted the Army looking for more exact records, but unfortunately all

of Uncle Chet’s Army records had been destroyed in the St. Louis records’

fire of about 1970. You have indicated that his body is indeed buried in the U.S.

 

How did you find this out?  How did you know where to look?

 

Larry

—————————–

Reply-To: bpdesigns@earthlink.net

Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 09:36:25 -0700

To: “Larry Smith” <lsmith@wave.net>

 

Subject: RE: Uncle Chet

 

I just kept digging.

 

I found Aunt Bonnie’s record in SSDI.  (She had not remarried).  Because

her last place of residence was Spokane, WA and I had found Chester and

Bonnie in the early census records in Spokane, I searched in Goggle for

Bonnie Bennett.  I found these records in the cemetery listings for Spokane    ROOTSWEB.COM   at:

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/wa/spokane/cemetery/pinesab.txt

 

These sites are all contributed by volunteers.

 

When bodies were shipped back, they would contact the nearest of kin, (in

this case, Aunt Bonnie) and all correspondence and record copies were sent to that person.  Apparently the family was not in correspondence with Aunt Bonnie all those years.  BEV…

 

Reply-To: bpdesigns@earthlink.net

Date: Tue, 21 Sep 2004 18:24:20 -0700

To: “Larry Smith” <lsmith@wave.net>

Subject: FW: PinesCemetery

 

This is the volunteer who transcribed the information for the Cemetery where Uncle Chester and Aunt Bonnie are buried.  I asked him if any information was available re; dates of interment.

 

This is what he responded.

 

Bev…

 

From: Robert Stallman <mailto:r.stallman@worldnet.att.net>

To: bpdesigns@earthlink.net

Sent: 9/21/2004 3:57:23 PM

Subject:PinesCemetery

 

Hi, this is what I was able to get from PinesCemetery.

 

Chester O Bennett, Date of death, Nov. 27, 1942. War casualty, Burial date May 13, 1949. age 50 at death. Smith Mortuary

 

Bonnie A. Bennett, Date of death Dec. 24, 1978, Burial date Dec. 26, 1978. Age 86, ThornhillValley Mortuary.

 

There was a probate by Cooper, Cooper and Roberts, 1522 North Howard Spokane WA 99205. Dated 0-21-1979.

 

A person by the name of Ruth Leonard took care of the arrangements

 

As far as finding an obit you might check with the newspaper, maybe they will search their archives. http://www.spokesmanreview.com/

 

Hope this helps,

Bob Stallman

 

http://home.att.net/~tombstone.bob/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 26, 2004

 

Uncle Chester was living in WashingtonState, as shown in Census Records.

 

His widow, Bonnie (Bennett) Bennett lived there until her death.

-SSDI -

BONNIE BENNETT

SSN  534-22-2903

Residence:   99216 Spokane, Spokane, WA

 

Born  12 Sep 1892       Last Benefit: Died         Dec 1978   Issued: WA

 

Issued                 (Before 1951)

 

———————————————-

 

Elmer Bennett Family Travels  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Dec 4, 2000 

Categories: Elmer Bennett Family

 

Elmer Cortis Bennett, Son of Emerick Bennett, Grandson of Garrett Bennett

1 – Oral History of Elmer Cortis Bennett by his daughter, Gertrude May (Bennett) Smith, as recorded by her daughter, Addie Winifred (Smith) Wold and transcribed by her grandson, Larry Bennett Smith.

2 – Elmer Bennett Travels.   Timeline for his travels.

3 – Map of his travels.

1.   Grandma Smith Reminisces

 

1. Elmer Cortis Bennett   was born   January the 20th 1860 in Burke, New York At age 22, in 1883 he traveled by himself to:

 

2. NormanCounty, town of Ada, Minnesota and took a homestead there.   He married Ida Cora Call and had three children, Gertrude, Winifred and Chester. A son was stillborn and his wife died in November of 1898.   He sold the homestead   and   in   1900 he and his children traveled to:

 

3. Ponoka. Alberta Canada, 6 miles south of Edmonton where he homesteaded. He remarried.   His oldest daughter, Gertrude married, She stayed in Canada when Elmer   and the rest of his family left Canada.   He lived in Canada 7.5 years, then in 1908 they moved to;

 

4. Colorado and started a restaurant, then to:

 

5. Farmington, New   Mexico.   Elmer became ill in 1911.   His second wife decided to take him to Washington where one of her married daughters was living.  She got into the baggage car and she sat with him in the baggage car.   And they went to:

 

6. Ellensburg, Washington.   Two or three days after they got there, he died, the 22nd of April 1912.   He’s buried there.

 

Burke NY- to- Ada, MN = 1468.4 miles

Ada, MN- to- Ponoka, Alberta, Canada = 1114.82

Ponoka, Alberta, Canada –to- Colorado = 1317.4 miles

Colorado -to- Farmington, New Mexico = 293.9 miles

FarmingtonNew Mexico –to- Ellensburg, WA = 1279.9 miles

————————————

EMERICK BENNETT FAMILY  

 

Emerick Bennett – Oral history by his granddaughter, Gertrude May (Bennett) Smith:  recorded by her daughter, Addie Winifred (Smith) Wold, and transcribed by her grandson, Larry Bennett Smith

 

Taped: December 12, 1974

 

Oral History of Emerick Bennett

 

As told by his

Granddaughter, Gertrude May (Bennett) Smith

 

() denotes Aunt Addie’s voice.

 

Grandfather (Emerick) Bennett settled on a homestead there in that part of New York

 

(the northern part, close to the Canadian line. Malone was the closest city).

 

Father (Elmer Cortis) Bennett helped clear the forest, hardwood timber.   Father helped plant an apple orchard on Grandfather’s place and had to take over a great deal of the work.

 

When Grandfather went into the army (Northern Army) in the Civil War.   He was in for three years.   Then he had to be discharged because his trigger finger was shot off.   His health never was good after that.   Father stayed at home until he was 22.   He had 2 brothers, two younger brothers and 2 sisters.   The younger brother took over the farm after Father (Elmer) went to Minnesota and took a homestead there.

 

When Father (Elmer) was young and still at home, Grandfather (Emerick) was in a lot of pain.   Father was working out in the timber.   Grandmother (Lucia) told Father he’d have to go after a doctor.  It was 20 miles to Malone. Grandfather had an abscess in his side and when the doctor came he said it would have to be opened.   He wanted Grandmother to hold the lamp while he performed the operation.   Grandmother said she couldn’t do it…stand there and hold the lamp.   So Grandfather said, “Give me the lamp.” And the doctor said, “You can’t hold it!”.   And Grandfather said, “Yes I can!”   and he held the lamp while they opened the abscess.

 

(So, keep a stiff upper lip.   So you can see what stern stuff you’re made of.)

 

When he was in the Union army, when he had his finger shot off, they didn’t have the medicines that they have now for infection and had very crude medical supplies.   They weren’t even as good as the 1800’s in the hospitals because they were out in the field.

Gangrene set in the Grandfather’s finger. They had to trim it back 2 or 3 times before they got rid of the Gangrene.   Grandfather (Emerick) would put his arm around a post and hold up his finger and they would trim it off.   No anesthesia.   They were made of stern stuff in those days.

[Note:   At the time of this oral history, Gertrude was 88 years of age.   She was mentally sharp and her memories were strong and accurate as records above can attest.]

 

 Burke Center Cemetery  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 29, 2003  

Categories: Cemetery Records, Emerick Bennett Family

 

Burke, Franklin County, New York

 

DIRECTIONS: This cemetery is located right on Route 11 in BurkeCenter.

COORDINATES: N 440 55.035′ W 0740 11.711′

 

NOTES:  This cemetery was transcribed by Michael J. & Joyce M. Ranieri on 1 & 2 July 2002. Upon completion, it was compared to a transcription compiled by Mrs. George Humphrey & Mrs. Samuel C. Coleman, Adirondack Chapter D.A.R. in November of 1937.

 

For transcription purposes, we divided the cemetery into four sections. Click here to see a drawing of the cemetery.

Click here to see general photographs of the cemetery.

Click here to see a listing compiled by Phyllis Thompson in May 2000. It is not a transcription, but a combination   of information obtained from the stones, cemetery records, and obituaries.

The earliest burial appears to be that of Deborah HAWKS who died March 8, 1810 in her 11th   year.

 

 

BENNETT Section 2

 

Emrick 1938 – 1930 142nd N.Y.V.I.

Lucia His Wife 1835 – 1908

Footstones: Father, Mother

 

BENNETT Section 1

Addie C. ROCK Wife of Jefferson D. BENNETT Died Aug. 30, 1892 AE 22 Y’rs. 6 Mos.

 

BENNETT Section 1

On the east side:

 

Justus BENNETT Died 20 Jan. 1893 Aged 64 Y’rs. & 17 Days

Lucretia His Wife Died 1 Sept. 1895 Aged 60 Y’rs. At Rest

 

On the north side:

Leslie E. Died 26 (25) Sept. 1862 Aged 3 Yrs. & 3 Mos.

Celia S. Died 1871 Aged 4 Mos.

Warren C. Died 4 July 1878 Aged 3 Yrs. 7 Mos. & 11 Days

Myron A. Died 1879 Aged 4 Mos.

 

BENNETT Section 2

 

Jefferson D. 1869 – 1957

Alice HILL His Wife 1871 – 1955

 

BENNETT Section 1

Leslie G. Son of E. & L. BENNETT Died Jan. 30, 1900 AE 32 Y’rs. (NOTE: This stone is broken and lying flat on the ground.)

 

BENNETT Section 2

 

Jefferson D. BENNETT Died Nov. 7, 1907 AE 81 Y’rs.

Footstone: J.D.B.           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Descendants of Eli Smith  

 

Bev (Caton) Pinelli – Mar 5, 2003

Categories: Eli Smith Descendants

 

1 Eli Smith b: 17 OCT 1807

+ Julia Ann Tuttle Sex: F Birth: 6 NOV 1826 in RushCounty, Indiana

 

Father: Enos Starling Tuttle b: 21 NOV 1795 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut

Mother: Rhoda Benson b: 18 FEB 1803

Marriage 1 Joseph Wamsley b: 1818

? Married: 5 FEB 1848 in Marshall, Indiana

Children

1. Dwight Clinton Wamsley

2. James Wamsley

3. Justina Caroline Wamsley

 

Marriage 2 Eli Smith b: 17 OCT 1807 in Pennsylvania

? Married: 20 JAN 1853 in MarshallCounty, Indiana

Children

1. Elias Washington Smith b: 30 OCT 1853

2. Aaron T. Smith b: 12 MAY 1855

3. Flora Rhoda Smith b: 18 OCT 1857 in Indiana

4. LeRoy Martin Smith b: 2 APR 1866 in Bourbon, MarshallCounty, Indiana

 

2 Elias Washington Smith b: 30 OCT 1853 Bourbon, MarshallCounty, Ind. d. 27 APR 1925

+   Ida Eugenia DeLair b. 17 APR 1855

m. 16 DEC 1872

3 Aaron Victor Smith   b. 21 NOVMarshallCounty, Indiana

+ Gertrude May Bennett b. 8NOV 1885

d. 4 FEB 1981 Los Angeles, CA

m. 29 MAR 1905   Ponoka AlbertaCanada

4 Eva Emerald Smith b. 15 FEB 1906 Ponoka AlbertaCanada

d. 12 SEP 1956 Kalispell, Mont.

4 Addie Winifred Smith   b.15 OCT Spokane, Washington

d. 2 OCT 1981     Los Angeles, CA

+ Bernard Quentin Wold b. 13 DEC 1908, Everett, WA

d. 29 Dec 1999 Los Angeles, CA

m. 6 JUL 1931   Los Angeles, CA

4 Ila May Smith b. 28 DEC 1908 Deary Idaho

d. 26 DEC 1930 Kalispell, Mont.

+ Norman Allan Darrow b. 8 AUG 1883 Chester, Iowa

d. 13 MAY 1957 Spokane, WA

m. 5 May 1928 Browning, Mont.

4 Fern Dilena Smith b. 1 JUL 1910 Little Bear Ridge, Idaho

d. Dec 1981 Columbia Falls, Mont.

+Harry Earl Kraft b. 25 DEC 1892 Cincinnati, OH

d. 25 MAR 1943   Eugene, OR

m. 16 July 1929   Kalispell, Mont.

 

4 Elmer Bennett Smith b. 4 JAN 1913 Little Bear Ridge, Idaho

+Ruby Helen Lucielle Rasmussen b. 7 JAN 1917 Kalispell, Mont.

m. 10 JUN 1935 Salmon City, Idaho

 

4 Myrtle Alice Smith b. 22 MAR 1916 d. 23 MAR 1916 Onaway, Idaho

4 Violet Luella Smith   b.13 AUG 1917 Garfield/Dawson County, Mont.

d. 14 NOV 1981   Santa Cruz, CA

+Lawrence Marion Caton   b.   17 MAY 1914   Big Fork, Mont.

d. 17 Nov 1974 Santa Cruz, CA

m. 31 AUG 1935 Kalispell, Mont.

 

4 Harland Chester Smith b. 28 April 1920 Kalispell, Mont.

d. 13 June 1992 CA

+Judith Prestbye b. 22 NOV 1924   Kalispell, Mont.

d. 21 NOV 1988 Santa Clara, CA

m. 26 June 1946 Kalispell, Mont.

4 Ethel Irene Smith b. 11 AUG 1921   Essex, Mont.

+ 1. Aaron Cornelius Perkins b. 28 DEC 1910 Mineral Wells, TX

d. 14 JUL 1956 Compton, CA

m. 16 FEB 1946 Culver City, CA

+2 Bernard Quentin Wold b. 13 DEC 1908, Everett, WA

d. 29 Dec 1999 Los Angeles, CA

m. 1982 Los Angeles, CA

4 Bonnie Charlotte Smith b. 1 MAR 1925 Essex, Mont.

+Jack Herbert Land b. 15 MAY 1925 Los Angeles, CA

m. 26 JUN 1948 Fresno, CA

4 Fay Laurel Smith b 23 APR 1927 Essex, Mont.

+Raymond Bergthold Schmidt b. 15 MAY 1925 Corn, Oklahoma

m. 12 DEC 1951

4 Ramona Adele Smith b. 13 AUG 1928 Los Angeles, CA

d. 11 Jan 2002

+John Ellsworth b. 22 SEP 1918 Glasgow, Mont.

d. 12 MAY 1979 Los Angeles, CA

                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Smith <mailto:lsmith@wave.net>

To: Stan Maine <mailto:smaine@northnet.org>

Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 1:05 AM

Subject: Re: 142nd Vol. Infantry

 

Thank you for the good information. I have contacted the National Archives and they have sent me 200 pages of my great grandfather’s war records. Fifteen pages or so are during the actual war, and the remainder is about his efforts to get his pension. Many, many medical reports and letters that give a real insight into his character. After reading through them I have come to a much better understanding of the man.

 

What I would like know is information about the 142nd, and where they served. I have a record of one battle that he fought in, but mostly his sick call records.  At least I now know where he was during most of the war, but I would like to know where his unit was.

 

If there is a charge I would be happy to pay it. It would help if the info were available electronically.  Is that possible?   I do not need detailed info, just enough to provide background as to where he was mustered in and where the units fought.

 

Thanks so much for your help.

 

Larry Smith

Jacksonville, Oregon

——————————

Hi Larry,

 

Glad to try to help you. There are many sites online that can help you get a timeline for the 142nd’s service.  The first site is New York in the Civil War.  I have been to that site and have copied and pasted the page for the 142nd

 

http://library.morrisville.edu/local_history/sites/unitinfo/142inf.html

 

I think that you can get back to the main page from that page.

Next is a book called New York in the War of the Rebellion.  It was written by Phisterer and published in the early 1900s.  I will have to look for it on line. I know that it’s there but I have lost my bookmarks for it.  There I got it!  It’s under the government’s soldiers and sailors system.  You can access the 142nd at http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/regiments.htm

 

I am not sure that will go right there but you can get to the right page through that site.

We have a few diaries and letters from soldiers that were in the 142nd at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association. SLCHA I don’t know where you live but it could be worth a trip to Canton, NY.

Well, try these sites and see if they help.   Please write back if you have more questions.

Stan Maine  smaine@northnet.org

———————————-

On 3/18/04 5:55 PM, Stan Maine at smaine@northnet.org wrote:

Hi again,

I just wanted to add this site for your research: http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/warweb.html

This site should get you almost anything that you want!

Tell me how you’re doing.

 

Stan

 

 

(But Elmer Cortis Bennett never complained about his lot in life?)

 

No, not in all of his troubles, I never heard him complain or wonder why.   He kept his faith through it all. Not long ago I heard a minister, Jerry Falwell, say you can’t judge a man by what he owned or what he had done but by what it took to break him.  I thought of Father.

 

I never lost my Faith.  It was part of my being because my father and mother always had family worship every morning.  And it was just a part of me just like my A, B, and C’s.  I remember when Father was dying in 1912 and he was in Colorado and I was in Idaho.  My stepmother wrote that while he was lying there with cancer he sang “Abide With Me”.

 

Grandma Gertrude “Gertie” Bennett Smith – age 90

December 12, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonnie Bennett’s family information

Bonnie Adelaide Bennett was born 12 Sept 1892, Vassar, Tuscola County, MI, to Elmer William Bennett & Mary Jane Dean, the eldest of four sisters.  She attended school in KootenaiCounty after her family moved to Idaho between 1902-before Sept 1903.  She is mentioned in the Northern Idaho News as doing a recitation “The Blue and the Gray” for the 4th of July in Colburn, ID.  Like her sisters she took violin classes but unlike them you never hear of her playing in public nor was it ever mentioned that she played seriously.  She went to WSU for a prep class, in what it doesn’t say.  She married Chester,  22 June 1919, Opportunity, WA, in the Bennett home.  It was a very large home with plenty of land out back some of which was in orchard.  The Lottie Bennett named as witness on the marriage certificate is my grandmother, Charlotte Marie Bennett, Ruth Idaho Bennett, the next youngest also served as a telephone operator.  Chester & Bonnie were active members of Orchard Masonic Lodge in Opportunity.  I know that at one time they lived in Seattle as my father was sent to live with them for two years while his mother went back to college to get teaching certification so she could support her family

when the banks crashed.  In June 1931 they left for California but were back in Opportunity by Jan. 1937 and went on a long trip back east with Bonnie’s sister, now Ruth Leonard and their mother.  They were heading for the Philippines in the Summer of 1940 and Bonnie went with him.  She was sent home June 1941 and nearly had their house completed and he was counting the days to retirement.  A letter mailed 19 Nov 1941 to my Grandmother was the last that the family heard from him.  The household goods were shipped from Manila and torpedoed.  The only thing that made it to Spokane was an ornate, handcarved, camphor-wood chest that now sits in our livingroom.  Bonnie had been planning to meet him for New Year’s in San Francisco.  Until I started combing through old newspapers and finding stuff my Dad had stashed away we unaware that his body had been returned to Opportunity for burial.  Later on one of the men that served with Chester came to see Bonnie and in the process converted her to Jehovah Witness, she’d been a member of Opportunity Presbyterian before her conversion.  She’d always mail “The Watchtower” to my parents after she was done with them and was always hoping to convert them.  All three sisters lived next to one another with my Gran’s house first, Bonnie’s single-story house next, followed by Ruth’s, so when we went to visit we just went house hopping.  The big field ran in back of all three houses so as kids we could run and simply squat down to hide in the tall grass.  Bonnie had sharp eyesight and could find anyone and anything even in all that grass.  Do to health issues she had to have a hysterectomy when she was quite young otherwise there probably would have been children.  She enjoyed having us around and we have some pieces of petrified wood that she collected and kept in a dish on the livingroom coffee table.  The end of her life was quite sad though, as she was on medication for various health issues and fellow Witnesses were supplying her with wine.  She signed her estate away to them and when she went into hospital not a one of them came to see her.  When she died 23 Dec 1978, Spokane, WA,  they called my Grandmother and told her there was no money to pay for the funeral to which she replied, “That’s odd because you got it all.”  They did finally come across with the money to pay for her funeral, very grudgingly.

Bonnie was the first to die and it was like dominoes with Grandma in 1979, and Ruth in 1982.  I don’t know what became of the youngest sister, only that she was born in Colburn or Sandpoint, ID, August 1912.  First and last mention.

 

From: kinasil@comcast.net [mailto:kinasil@comcast.net]
Sent: Sunday, November 06, 2011 1:50 PM
To: Lloyd Smith
Subject: Re: An idea

Lloyd,

The photo we have is your 6 month photo. Mom’s having cataract surgery on Wednesday so won’t be able to do anything about the album until after that, then maybe I could meet you son in one of the Bremerton-Seattle ferry terminals.  Whatever you do don’t lose the album or I’ll be one dead genealogist and don’t be surprised if some of the information is wrong.  I have Chester’s obit but it’s one of those undated documents and in going through the Spokane Valley Herald in Spokesman-Review wasn’t able to find it.  If it’s in the Chronicle I can’t access that paper unless the State Library has managed to make copies of Whitworth’s microfilm.  In the album there’s also a photo to Chester and Bonnie from the “Naughty Twins” who appear to be girls. Chester was the only consistent male role model for my Dad when he was growing up, was in the Army himself, and consumed all he could about Corrigador & Bataan and I think that’s why Bonnie left him what we have on Chester.

All for now,

From: kinasil@comcast.net <mailto:kinasil@comcast.net>
Date: November 11, 2011 9:03:42 PM PST
To: Lloyd Smith <lsmithtwin@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: Phone number?

Lloyd,

I work at the Sylvan Way branch of Kitsap Regional Library in Bremerton.  Mom’s doing well.  I’ve been putting drops in her eye, taping the nightguard over it, and pulling stuff out of the lower cupboards as that’s a no-no for now.  I was born in July 1959, Mom is 9 years older than you and my dad is 15.  I finally managed to post the my Bennetts on the Idaho Family Group Sheets site.  Maybe someone will have an answer to what happened to the youngest Bennett sister.

Always, Lisa

From: kinasil@comcast.net [mailto:kinasil@comcast.net]
Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2011 8:48 PM
To: Lloyd Smith
Subject: Re: Working on…

Bernard Eugene Schureman is Bonnie & Chester’s nephew. He is the son of Bonnie’s sister Charlotte (Lottie) Marie Bennett & Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr.  After his father left in 1931 for Michigan his mother who was a symphony violionist went back to Eastern Washington to get a teaching degree so she could support the family and do to the loss of the Schureman family home she had to move back in with her parents.  Dad went to live with Bonnie and Chester for about two years while they were stationed at FortLawton in Seattle while his little sister stayed in Spokane. Chester was the positive male role model for my Dad growing up.  Dad didn’t see his father until he had graduated, joined the Army, and was passing through Chicago on his way back East and found that they didn’t have much to say to each other.  The Army did a thorough background check not only because of his father’s record but because the American Nazi Party had contacted the family during WWII. Awkward!  We’re Dutch Schuremans not German ones.  The photos are a combination of Warren & Washington County, NY, Bennett photos and those that Dad inherited from Bonnie that have members of Chester’s family in them.  I finally figured out that the one photo we have of a man in robes is the Reverend Rensselear Bennett.  The genealogy had to catch up with the photos. Unfortunately, by the time I started the genealogy the generation that I could have asked were either dead or sinking into dementia.  I will send a photocopy of my parents before Dad’s osteoperosis and removal of his right eye.  I threatened to take a picture of them after Mom had cataract surgery, nearly didn’t survive that suggestion.

 

From: <kinasil@comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Nov 2011
To: Larry Smith <jvsmith@clearwire.net>
Subject: Re: Bennett info

Larry,

The letter was mailed to my grandmother Charlotte Marie Bennett 19 Nov. 1941, in response to a letter she’d sent him wishing him a happy birthday.  Bonnie was my grandmother Lottie’s older sister  who married Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr., They had my Dad, Bernard Eugene and younger sister Lola Jane.  I live in Bremerton, WA, as my Dad got tired of Eastern Washington’s two climate weather; very very hot and very very cold.  Mom was born and raised her the daughter of Norwegian immigrant who gained his citizenship serving in the Army at Camp Lewis he married my Scottish grandmother who had come over to visit relatives for a year.  I’ll see if Walgreen’s can scan the photos for me as I don’t trust the US Postal Service.  I work in the InterLibrary Loan Dept. of our local library and you wouldn’t believe how many books go missing in the mail.  I had posted my Bennett & Dean group sheets on the Michigan Family Group Sheets site which means they can be Googled on the web. I tried posting them on the Idaho site but it wasn’t working at the time.   Cyrus D. was an unusual enough name.  It turns out that there are photos of you and your brother as babies in the album as well as Chester and his siblings. Chester was with McArthur, he did survive the Bataan Death March, but died in Cabanatuan POW Camp of dysentery.  Your brother friended me on Facebook where I posted photos of the hand-carved camphor wood chest and Chester’s WWI medals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The way our main Bennett line looks is like this:

Benajah Bennett, Washington Co., NY

Benajah Bennett, Washington & Warren Co., NY m. Polly Putman

Hiram L. Bennett-Clarissa Bidwell, Hiram was b. 1803, Washington Co., NY, d. 1890 Almer, Michigan

Cyrus D. Bennett-Ellen Jane Williams, Cyrus was b. 1844, Elmira, NY, d. 1927, Opportunity, WA.  It’s through Ellen Jane that I wind up with Phoebe Bennett.  Ellen Jane was the daughter of David O. Williams and Sarah, David’s parents were Aaron and Hannah Sprague.  They had been from Orleans and Dutchess   County, NY and Hannah’s mother’s name was Phoebe Bennett.

Elmer William Bennett-Mary Jane Dean

As WWII was still going on when his funeral took place, my guess is his body was disinterred once the Philippines had been liberated and sent home once supply lines were secure.  I’ll check the date of obit. tomorrow.  There are also photos of a gathering of Gertrude Bennett Smith’s family in this album.

All for now,

Lisa J. Schureman

 

==================

This family line was on her rootsweb archive site from 2002.

There is more, but I just cut and pasted the family line of Bonnie Bennett

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/BENNETT/2002-01/1011147993

Bennajah/Benajah Bennett b 1770s or 80s, lived in Salem and Argyle Towns,
Washington Co., NY and Bolton Town, Warren Co., NY. Had a family of at
least seven according to the 1790-1820 Censuses only one of whom is
positively identified.

Hiram L. Bennett b. 28 Aug. 1803, NY, d. 29 Nov. 1890, Almer, MI, bur. 2
Dec. 1890, Vassar, MI, mar. circa 1839-40 Clarissa Bidwell b. 1819-20,
d. 7 Apr. 1857, MI, bur. Thetford, Genesee Co., MI. They had the
following;

Cyrus D. Bennett b. 26 Oct. 1844, Elmira, Chemung Co., NY, d. 9 Oct. 1927,
Vera, Spokane Co., WA, bur. 12 Oct. 1927, Opportunity, WA, mar. 22
Jan. 1865, Forest, MI, to Ellen Jane Williams b. 12 Mar. 1848, NY, d.30
Mar. 1910, Sandpoint, Bonner Co., Idaho

Elmer William Bennett b. 10 Sept. 1868, Millington, MI, d. 5 May 1947,
Opportunity, WA, mar. 21 Dec 1891, Vassar, MI to Mary Jane Dean b. 14
Mar. 1869, Ontario, Canada, d. 5 June 1959, Opportunity, WA, bur. 8 June
1959, Opportunity, WA

 

OBIT: Elmer W. Bennett, employed as a saw filer at the Spokane Block Plant since September 8=9, 1922, died at his home in Opportunity, Washington, May 5, 1947, after a long illness.

 

Born in 1869 in Michigan, Mr. Bennett came west early in this century and settled near what is now Colburn, Idaho, where he established a shingle mill. Later he moved, with his family, to the SpokaneValley, where he had a farm prior to coming to work for the The Diamond Match Company.

 

During the many years he was employed at the Block Plant he was a capable and efficient workman and was highly respected by all who were associated with him. Surviving are his wife, Mary Jane, and three daughters, Mrs. C. W. Leonard, Mrs. A. H. Meir, and Mrs Bonnie Bennett, all residents of the SpokaneValley.

Children of Elmer and Mary Bennett

Bonnie Adelaide b. 12 Sept 1892, Vassar, MI, d. 23 Dec. 1978, Spokane, WA,
bur. 26 Dec 1978, Spokane, mar. Chester O. Bennett 22 June 1919, Spokane,
WA

Charlotte Marie b. 29 Nov. 1901, MI, d. 3 Mar 1979, Spokane, WA, bur. 7
Mar. 1979, Spokane, WA, mar. 1st to Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr. 17
Feb. 1924, Opportunity, WA, mar. 2nd to Awald H. Meier 1945, Spokane, WA

Ruth Idaho Bennett b. 30 Sept. 1903, Colburn, Bonner Co., Idaho, d. 22
Feb. 1982 and bur. 25 Feb. 1982, Spokane, WA, mar 30 Aug. 1934 to Charles
W. Leonard

My grandparents are C.A. Schureman and Lottie Bennett and while there are
a few more generations to post my alotted time is up. I’ve also got
another Bennett line that comes in from the Williams line to share with
you. Thanks in advance.

Lisa in Bremerton
lschurem@linknet.kitsap.lib.wa.us

 

 

 

 

Bonnie Bennett family information.

 

From: Lisa Schureman <lschurem@linknet.kitsap.lib.wa.us> 
Subject: [BENNETT] My brickwall Bennajah Bennett 
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 18:26:33 -0800 (PST)

I’m posting this hoping that someonw might recognize my footloose line

 

Bennajah/Benajah Bennett b 1770s or 80s, lived in Salem and ArgyleTowns,

Washington Co., NY and Bolton Town, Warren Co., NY. Had a family of at

least seven according to the 1790-1820 Censuses only one of whom is

positively identified.

 

Hiram L. Bennett b. 28 Aug. 1803, NY, d. 29 Nov. 1890, Almer, MI, bur. 2

Dec. 1890, Vassar, MI, mar. circa 1839-40 Clarissa Bidwell b. 1819-20,

d. 7 Apr. 1857, MI, bur. Thetford, Genesee Co., MI. They had the

following;

 

William James Bennett b. 18 Jan 1841, Warrensburg, Warren, NY, d. 30 July

1916, Holly, Oakland Co., MI bur. 1 Aug. 1916 Vassar, MI, mar. 19

Nov. 1866, Forest, Genesee Co., MI to Ophelia Adeline Taylor b. 7 July

1847, Genesee Co., MI, d. 31 Mar. 1915, Holly, MI, bur. 3 Apr. 1915,

Vassar, MI

 

Orville Bennett b. 1842, NY, mar. circa 1869 to Mary Augusta ?

 

Cyrus D. Bennett b. 26 Oct. 1844, Elmira, Chemung Co., NY, d. 9 Oct. 1927,

Vera, Spokane Co., WA, bur. 12 Oct. 1927, Opportunity, WA, mar. 22

Jan. 1865, Forest, MI, to Ellen Jane Williams b. 12 Mar. 1848, NY, d.30

Mar. 1910, Sandpoint, Bonner Co., Idaho

 

Betsey M. Bennett b. 1847, NY, mar. 22 Oct. 1867, Thetford, MI, to Samuel

P. Smith

 

Ellen Bennett b. 17 Aug. 1850, NY

 

Mary Bennett b. 1852, MI, mar. 8 Jan. 1876, to Charles L. Smith

 

Eliza Bennett b. 1856, MI

 

 

 

 

Gen.3

 

Offspring of William James and Ophelia Taylor Bennett.

 

Laura A. Bennett b. 15 Aug. 1857, MI, mar. Edward Hitchcock

Orletta M. Bennett b. 20 Nov. 1868, d. 1 Oct. 1869

William L. Bennett b. 1 Oct. 1870 Alive in Everett, WA in 1915

Clarisa J. Bennett b. 26 Aug. 1872

Adeliza T. Bennett b. 1 Feb. 1875

James G. Bennett b. 15 Dec. 1881 Alive in Holly, MI in 1915

Winnie J. Bennett b. 20 June 1884 mar. ? Gerstine

 

Offspring of Cyrus D. and Ellen Jane Bennett

 

Charles Orville Bennett b 1867, MI, d. 6 Oct. 1914, Aberdeen, WA

bur. Spokane, WA

 

Elmer William Bennett b. 10 Sept. 1868, Millington, MI, d. 5 May 1947,

Opportunity, WA, mar. 21 Dec 1891, Vassar, MI to Mary Jane Dean b. 14

Mar. 1869, Ontario, Canada, d. 5 June 1959, Opportunity, WA, bur. 8 June

1959, Opportunity, WA

 

Edward Livingston Bennett b. 1873, d. 21 Jan. 1938, Cascade, Idaho

 

Maud Bennett b. 16 Sept. 1881, Vassar, MI, d. 30 Oct. 1948, Spokane, WA,

bur. 3 Nov. 1948, Spokane, WA mar. Henry Platz 15 June 1907, Chicago, IL

 

Gen. 4

 

Children of Elmer and Mary Bennett

 

Bonnie Adelaide b. 12 Sept 1892, Vassar, MI, d. 23 Dec. 1978, Spokane, WA,

bur. 26 Dec 1978, Spokane, mar. Chester O. Bennett 22 June 1919, Spokane,

WA

 

Charlotte Marie b. 29 Nov. 1901, MI, d. 3 Mar 1979, Spokane, WA, bur. 7

Mar. 1979, Spokane, WA, mar. 1st to Charles Arlington Schureman, Jr. 17

Feb. 1924, Opportunity, WA, mar. 2nd to Awald H. Meier 1945, Spokane, WA

 

Ruth Idaho Bennett b. 30 Sept. 1903, Colburn, Bonner Co., Idaho, d. 22

Feb. 1982 and bur. 25 Feb. 1982, Spokane, WA, mar 30 Aug. 1934 to Charles

W. Leonard

 

My grandparents are C.A. Schureman and Lottie Bennett and while there are

a few more generations to post my alotted time is up. I’ve also got

another Bennett line that comes in from the Williams line to share with

you. Thanks in advance.

 

Lisa in Bremerton

 

 

 

 

Michigan Family Group Sheet

 

Elmer William BENNETT Family

Counties: Tuscola & Iosco

Submitted by: Lisa SchuremanPlease contact submitter with any questions or to exchange data on this family.

 HUSBAND & WIFE

Husband:   BENNETT, Elmer William

Birth   Date: 10 September 1868

Birth   Place: Millington, Tuscola Co., MI

Death   date: 5 May 1947

Death   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., Wa

Burial   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Father:   BENNETT, Cyrus D.

Mother:   WILLIAMS, Ellen Jane

Wife:   DEAN, Mary Jane

Birth   Date: 14 March 1869

Birth   Place: Caistor, Lincoln Co., Ontario,    Canada

Death   date: 5 June 1959

Death   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Burial   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Father:   DEAN, Hannibal   Rathburn, Sr.

Mother:   HEWSON/HOUSTON, Catherine

Marriage   Date: 21 December 1891  Marriage   Place: Vassar, Tuscola Co., MI 

CHILDREN

Child   No. 1: BENNETT, Bonnie Adelaide

Sex: F

Birth   Date: 12 September 1892

Birth   Place: Vassar, Tuscola Co., MI

Death date:   23 December 1978

Death   Place: Spokane, Spokane Co., WA

Burial   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Marriage   date: 22 June 1919

Marriage   place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Spouse’s   name: BENNETT, Chester   O.

Child   No. 2: BENNETT, Charlotte Marie

Sex: F

Birth   Date: 29 November 1901

Birth   Place: Iosco Co. ?, MI

Death   date: 3 March 1979

Death   Place: Spokane, Spokane Co. WA

Burial   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Marriage   date: 1) 17 February 1924

Marriage   place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Spouse’s   name: 1) SCHUREMAN, Charles Arlington, Jr.,   2) MEIER, Awald H

Child   No. 3: BENNETT, Ruth Idaho

Sex: F

Birth   Date: 30 September 1903

Birth   Place: Colburn, Bonner Co., ID

Death   date: 22 February 1982

Death   Place: Spokane, Spokane Co., WA

Burial   Place: Opportunity, Spokane Co., WA

Marriage   date: 30 August 1934

Marriage   place: 

Spouse’s   name: LEONARD, Charles Wesley

Child   No. 4: BENNETT, ?

Sex: F

Birth   Date: Circa August 1912

Birth   Place: Sandpoint, Bonner Co., ID

Death   date: 

Death Place: 

Burial   Place: 

Marriage   date: 

Marriage   place: 

Spouse’s   name: 

Documentation: 1910   Federal Census Bonner Co., ID, Lola Dolphin, Ilene & Bernard Schureman,   Northern Idaho News 1905-1913, Death certificates or Elmer W. Bennett &   Mary Jane Bennett, Elmer’s obit in Diamond Good Fellowship Bulletin June   1947, Spokane Valley Herald 9 May 1947 & the Spokesman-Review 7 May 1947,   Mary Jane’s obit Spokane Valley Herald 11 June 1959, Bonnie Bennett’s   marriage certificate, funeral service program, & obit from Spokane Valley   Herald 3 January 1979, Chester Bennett’s P.O.W. papers 6 October 1942,   Cabanatuan & 16 March 1943, War Dept.,& obit Spokane Valley Herald 23   July 1943 

 

 

 


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